0
$\begingroup$

Does using dyntopo in sculpting mode give the best results? When is dyntopo the most necessary? Can you make your mesh revert to less vertices after using dyntopo? basically a smoother surface, the way it looked before checking dyntopo?

I also got a warning message saying "Dyntopo will not preserve vertex colors, uvs or other custom data." And another one saying "Keeping the modifiers will increase polycount when returning to object mode."

I will appreciate any advice.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

"When is dyntopo the most necessary?"

Dyntopo can be nice because it puts in vertices where you're working, as opposed to subdividing the entire model which can prevent you from directly sculpting in more detail.

"Can you make your mesh revert to less vertices after using dyntopo? basically a smoother surface, the way it looked before checking dyntopo?"

Yes there are several ways you could do this, I'll just briefly explain two ways. You can duplicate your mesh and move it to another layer while you work on the mesh to refine some simple features, then bring the original mesh back and bake normal maps onto the simpler mesh to give the illusion that it has the higher polycount mesh's features. Another way is to retopologize your mesh after working. Keep in mind that neither of these are mutually exclusive and there are other things you can do too.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

You should only use Dynamic Topology if you make major changes to your mesh, especially if you want to expand an area out effectively changing the necessary Topology. Also you should avoid using Dyntopo if you use UVs and never use it with Subsurface on a mesh, because it works with triangles instead of quads.

For Example if you have a Cube and you want to add details on it you could do it with dyntopo if you don't bother with UVs Vertex Colors and Modifiers like the Subsurface Modifier but if you want to use any of it its not recommended. UVs can of course be added later on in the process but that more difficult for a triangle mesh than for a quad mesh (at least in my opinion). But there aren't only negatives to Dyntopo. For Example you want to make that same Cube but for a Game. Then it needs to have the least amount of triangles possible. Dyntopo adds only vertices where you need them, where the other way of doing it with a Multiresolution Modifier would add a lot of vertices everywhere to get the same level of detail, while keeping the topology. Also you could only use dyntopo if you want to sculpt something like a human from just a cube, because you don't have the correct topology for a human in a Cube

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

Dyntopo is for prototyping, major clay reworking of an object sculpt that needs more constant tesselation where there form/detail is added as the artist sculpts. Best workflow is to work out the model base to start from, sculpt with dyntopo to get the best form, retopologize to get a simpler all quad mesh. The new mesh can then be unwrapped for UV textures and adding a multiresolution modifier can allow more fine detail sculpt in the new mesh, and eventual baking to get bump/displacement/normal mapping.

I use dyntopo as live clay in this method.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.