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Ok, I'm not sure if I'm even asking the question correctly, and what I'm trying to do might be a bit on the weird side. So, I'll try to explain what I want to do, without sounding like a madman.

I have an image, shown below:

enter image description here

Now, I know how to apply the texture in the usual way. Getting it to look like this is easy:

enter image description here

What I want to do though, is this:

enter image description here

I can achieve that effect in the compositor simply enough, but I want to avoid using the compositor if at all possible. I was wondering if there was a way to do this with BI?

The reason I'm trying to do something so silly, is that I am primarily a pixel-artist, and I've been experimenting with trying to generate decent-looking pixel art via Blender. Once I'm able to do the above, I can then produce something like this:

enter image description here

Thanks in advance for any advice or nudges in the right direction!

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  • $\begingroup$ What render engine are you using? Use Screen or Window space texture coordinates $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos Oct 18 '17 at 13:27
  • $\begingroup$ Blender Internal. I'm not entirely sure how I would use Window texture coords in the node editor? Or do I not need to? $\endgroup$ – lakan-inocencio Oct 18 '17 at 13:41
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Its quite easy, just pick the "Window" coordinate in the texture panel under "Mapping"

enter image description here

One bit of advice though is that during animation, when you move the object or camera, the texture will move with it. i.e. your "pixels" wont stay in the same spot, so you will potentially have a flicker in your "dithering".

For stills though this is totally fine.

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  • $\begingroup$ I've tried this method previously, but it's not quite what I need. The shading on the object is still visible. I need to be able to completely eliminate everything, basically having the object act as a mask of sorts. That is, of course, unless I'm missing something in the settings, and doing this will actually get me what I need to do. I've tried it though, but I'm not yet a Blender expert, so I might indeed have overlooked some crucial step. $\endgroup$ – lakan-inocencio Oct 19 '17 at 4:39
  • $\begingroup$ Sounds like you need a tutorial for a custom shader and its not really an issue of the texture coordinate. But you're in luck since I did something similar with my ink shader like 7 years back: matrep.parastudios.de/… Download that shader and try to replace the noise textures with your pixel grid and play around with the color ramp, it should give you the effect you need. Its based on using the color ramp as a contrast control for light input. So your shadow is mixed with the pixel grid. (no nodes) $\endgroup$ – AdamTM Oct 19 '17 at 7:57
  • $\begingroup$ Alternatively make a new question and I/we will try and guide you through the process of making your own. $\endgroup$ – AdamTM Oct 19 '17 at 8:03
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In Cycles you would use the Texture Coordinates Node: enter image description here

You would use the Window output from this one to get the results you want

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  • $\begingroup$ With Cycles, it would indeed be easier to just use that node. My problem with Cycles though, is that it really is more geared towards photorealism and the sort, and there's really too much tweaking involved in order to get the simple NPR style that I'm looking for. $\endgroup$ – lakan-inocencio Oct 19 '17 at 4:40

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