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A couple of months ago I took Blender Guru's PBR tutorials to create the dielectric, metallic and uber shader. I find that these work really well, and I know of other PBR setups such as Remington's shader. However, with the release of the Principled shader, I was intrigued to know whether it would replace the need for all of these custom made PBR setups. Any knowledge over this would be greatly appreciated.

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  • $\begingroup$ Imho, the new "principled shader" could work better (or not) of your custom nodes, but its setup could be perhaps easier. Of course its inner working cannot be changed, user side, apart setting its various values. Anyway, you could listen the same "guru" evaluating this new shader... blendernation.com/2017/06/25/… and then maybe try and decide yourself which one to use (and when). $\endgroup$ – m.ardito Sep 11 '17 at 15:11
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Yes - and no.

For most 'real world' materials, the Principled shader should be able to produce very good results. However, it is not perfect and cannot deal with every situation - otherwise it would have far more parameters, inputs and sliders than would be practical.

The existing principled shader should be fine for pretty much all 'simple' materials - those where the visible effect is due to the material and surface properties alone - or where there is a single layer of 'clearcoat' that is within the capabilities of the 'clearcoat' parameters.

This should be sufficient for, say, 99 percent of materials (or more!). However, there are feasible situations where the principled shader is insufficient - and under those situations you would again need to combine multiple shaders. For example, a surface with multiple 'clearcoat' layers with different properties of each layer, or a surface where the micro-detail has a significant effect on the appearance (such as the fine structure of butterfly wing scales or the irridescence of beetle wingcases).

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