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I am working on a project where water needs to be sprayed so to form 60 deg full cone from the spray nozzle in an animation. I have tried it with inflow and v cylinder but when water leaves out it does not exapand to 60 deg as required. Can you please give m advise how to achieve that? I have done hollow cone spray with addition of obstacle but need full cone spray.

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Examining the subject at hand, it appears a better way would be to use particle drops instead of a fluid system.

The resulting cone can be easily controled.

enter image description here

The movement can be setup convincingly.

enter image description here

  1. Create an emitter object. Since we'll use the normal as emission, the concavity of this object will determine the outcoming angle.
    Add a subdivision surface modifier so that the normal direction won't appear stepped.
    Create a density weight group, in case you want more water to be emitted from the center.
    enter image description here
  2. Add a particle system. Since particle don't have substeps in Blender, we need to increase the frame rate. I used 240 fps.
    enter image description here
  3. Enter the vertex group as density for the emitter.
    enter image description here
  4. Decrease the gravity value, since we have a faster frame rate. To make the emitter use the subdivision modifier, check Use Modifiers. I use about 15000 particles in a short burst from frame 1-80.
    enter image description here
  5. During that burst, I want the particles to have more speed around frame 40 and less at the end. Hence, I animate the Emission value for the normal. I also added some random offset to fight the missing substeps.
    enter image description here
  6. Create a cube and smooth subdive it (or use *to sphere). Use it as the particle object. Add some children to each particle. There should be lots of drops.
    enter image description here
  7. In the compositing add vector blur. As a material I mixed Glossy and Refractions BSDF.

Sorry, the file is not in the finished state. Have fun.

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  • $\begingroup$ Blender does support substeps for particles. They're located in the Physics rollout > subframes $\endgroup$ – JtheNinja Jul 27 '17 at 18:04
  • $\begingroup$ @Leander:I sincerely thank you for the above answer . The reason I need fluid simulation is to check the % wetting of the part being sprayed with water and to ensure that complete part is getting wet. $\endgroup$ – MAHESH Jul 27 '17 at 21:06

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