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I'm not new in Blender but I'm really new in 3d print. I want to do a mechanism with, lets say, two gears and one handle, and I want to test, rotating the handle, if the mechanism works well before printing. The only solution that I found is use the rigid body simulator and drop a mesh to one of the gears and see rotate. But what I need if there any way to rotate a handle and see if the gears works well each other before print the model.

I want to rotate the handler to test the model, is that posible?

Thanks in advance!

UPDATE:

After search a bit more I found a solution :D I use the Rigid body physic to simulate the mechanism. I add a constrain to the red gear to act like a motor, so the gear rotate by itself. I saw the use of the constrain in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcO8ovnr_Z0 (wich I recommend to see) Thanks for the answers!

This gif probe that I made it (?) Gears involute

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    $\begingroup$ You could try simulating it with rigid body physics. However, note that blender's simulator is more intended for effects; there's no grantee it will work the same in the real world. That said, I've heard of it being successfully used to e.g. to check if a statue will balance. $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Jul 17 '17 at 23:08
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What you may want to try is you can import it into a website called Onshape, it is a free cad software, it requires an account but after that you should be good. You can import meshes into it, there are many tutorials online if you need help.

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  • $\begingroup$ Altough this is not the solution that I need, I have to thank you because I don't know about this website. Definitely I will use this tool in the future :-) $\endgroup$ – moro Jul 20 '17 at 14:18
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After search a bit more I found a solution :D I use the Rigid body physic to simulate the mechanism. I add a constrain to the red gear to act like a motor, so the gear rotate by itself. I saw the use of the constrain in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcO8ovnr_Z0 (wich I recommend to see) Thanks for the answers!

This gif probe that I made it (?) Gears involute

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I recently designed elliptical gears for a school project. I wanted to find out whether the gears would rotate or whether the teeth would get stuck. It turned out that blenders simulating capabillities weren't enough, so I had to manually animate the gears and check for every frame if there were overlapping teeth. This process was tedious, especially because it had to be done multiple times, but in the end it proved to be a reliable method. Note that this method only shows that the mechanism is capable of moving without getting stuck, and that some common sense is still required when determining whether or not it will actually work.

One of the animations: enter image description here

As for the example in your question, you're in luck. Regular gears only require you to animate the movement until the next teeth takes the position of the first, after which you can check whether anything overlaps, and if everything looks about right it will most likely work.

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There is a generator for gears on woodgears. Maybe try it for your gears.

http://woodgears.ca/gear_cutting/template.html

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