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I see in a lot of WIP-images people rendering their models untextured, but with a nice looking light. It's like there is a multicolored spectrum in the shadows. How do they achieve this? I see it in almost everyones "clay renders" (or how you call it). When I just render my model with a standard light source everything is completely monochrome.

The only way for me to achieve something like this is to add a 360-image as world background and set the light and image details to reflect in the model. I don't think this is how they do it.

Here is a couple of example on what I mean:

https://blenderartists.org/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=490894&d=1499709836

https://cdn.dribbble.com/users/24025/screenshots/972539/canon5d_clay_2013_shot.png

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    $\begingroup$ idk but did you try coloured lights? $\endgroup$ – m.ardito Jul 13 '17 at 17:40
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For regular modeling purposes, I usually have mildly colored OpenGL lights. In User Preferences -> System, I'll adjust the directions a bit and set the three OpenGL lights to pale yellow, green and magenta or some such mix. It helps with seeing 3D surface shapes, foreground/background distinction and staying oriented when I'm spinning the world around in edit mode.

For rendering, I may have colored lights on their own layer just for making renderings like that. Usually not. Normally I'll have a few layers of lights for the final render, and maybe a layer for special other renders.

For WIPs I usually screen-cap my work in edit mode. It looks more under-constructiony.

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Those are not colored shadows, shadows don't have a color per-se, they are just e slightly colored light sources.

Just add a slight tint to your lamp objects so one has a warmer redish tone, and the other has a cooler tone towards blueish or green.

This is generally done using a Three Point Light system, which is a well know lighting technique in photography also.

enter image description here

Optionally if you want more realistic shadows or natural lighting use a sphericall environment map in your scene's World nodes, Ideally HDR based or as regular JPG image.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Alright! Thanks for a really good answer. In my first real project I tried to achieve this by adding a world background image to get some variations in the lights. Would the three point light set up be a "cleaner" solution? Im trying to learn the "right way" so to speak. orig00.deviantart.net/be27/f/2017/194/0/4/… $\endgroup$ – Martin Edlund Jul 13 '17 at 19:17
  • $\begingroup$ There is no universal right and wrong here, just what best suits you particular case. HDR based lighting is definitely heavier on the computation side, requires more memory and is slower to calculate but more "realistic" if that is what you are looking for. Three point light is a "studio" lighting system if you are not making an outdoors scene that may be what you need. Three point light is also a lot quicker to render for faster images it is probably better. $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos Jul 13 '17 at 19:29
  • $\begingroup$ OK! Thank you for clearing this up! I really appreciate it! :) $\endgroup$ – Martin Edlund Jul 13 '17 at 19:38
  • $\begingroup$ Most welcome. If an answer helps you don't just thank in the comments, upvote it instead. If you feel it solved your problem in a satisfying manner then also consider marking it as accepted too. That is how this site works best. $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos Jul 13 '17 at 19:42

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