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I want to use a different style of projection, to achieve this effect:

effect http://www.boacompra.com/uoljogos/images/screenshot/tibia/shot10.jpg

I know how to create a projection matrix for it, but I don't know how to set that matrix on blender. How is it possible?

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  • $\begingroup$ It is similar, but the projection is not the same and the answer there is very incomplete (he just tells Most raster graphics editors have the tools to preform the above transformations. This can also be done in the compositor using a Blend texture and the Displace node. without going any further). $\endgroup$
    – Dokkat
    Apr 8, 2014 at 12:17
  • $\begingroup$ Could you use some specific terminology for the kind of projection you're looking for? - such terms can be searched for, where images cant. $\endgroup$
    – ideasman42
    Apr 8, 2014 at 13:14
  • $\begingroup$ @ideasman42 I don't know any term for that projection, unfortunately. We call it "45 degrees", but it is an internal name. I'll update the post with the formulas, as you asked. $\endgroup$
    – Dokkat
    Apr 8, 2014 at 19:05
  • $\begingroup$ short answer is no, you cant set a custom projection matrix, however added an answer to the question this is marked as a duplicate of, which I think may help you. $\endgroup$
    – ideasman42
    Apr 8, 2014 at 20:41
  • $\begingroup$ I can't comment there, so thanks for the answer, @ideasman42 . Another suggestion people gave on #blender was to use a lattice instead. I found that very elegant. $\endgroup$
    – Dokkat
    Apr 9, 2014 at 0:53

1 Answer 1

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Orthographic Camera Lens

In Blender, there are many settings that influence the way the camera views the scene, and hence how the scene is rendered. You can see these settings by selecting the camera in your scene, then looking in the Object Properties windnow:

enter image description here

Blender has three different Lenses cameras can use: Perspective, Orthographic, and Panoramic. The effect you are looking to achieve is called Orthographic projection/view.

To change a selected camera's Lens, do this:

  1. Select the camera
  2. In the Object Properties window, click on the Camera tab:

    enter image description here

  3. In this window, go to the Lens section and there you can select the Orthographic Lens:

    enter image description here

  4. Next, adjust the Orthographic Scale setting so your camera view includes everything you want it to:

    enter image description here

    NOTE: In order to keep the current view in Camera view when you adjust the camera's view, make sure you have Lock Camera To View enabled properly: when Lock Camera to View is enabled, the view will stay in Camera view when you pan or rotate the view. Otherwise, when you rotate the view, Blender will leave Camera view and go back into User view. To enable Lock Camera to View:

    • Properties panel (N) -> View section -> enable Lock Camera to View

    enter image description here

You can read more about the different Camera settings in the Blender Manual here.

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  • $\begingroup$ Unfortunately this is not Blender's Orthographic View. As you can see, the X/Y axis on my desired projection are not transformed at all. The formula is project(x,y,z) = vec2(x-z/2, y+z/2). Notice the tiles on the floor, the top of the piano, etc. It is completely different than Blender's orthographic view. $\endgroup$
    – Dokkat
    Apr 8, 2014 at 12:40
  • $\begingroup$ Oh, I finally see what you're trying to achieve. I would suggest you include your formula in your question, and also perhaps explain what the formula means, i.e. something to the effect that the X/Y axis is viewed from a Top Ortho view, while the Z axis is skewed. I think that would help other readers quickly understand the projection you want and there are lots of programmers here that might be able to figure out how to create such an effect. I don't think blender has built-in capability for that style of projection. $\endgroup$ Apr 8, 2014 at 13:42
  • $\begingroup$ IdeasMan42 is very knowledgeable in these kinds of things. $\endgroup$ Apr 8, 2014 at 13:43

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