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this is a problem regarding importing from Sculptris.

The model imported fine; but sometimes (seemingly at random), when I apply the texture/bumpmap it originally came with, instead of fitting over the model properly, it stretches hundreds of tiny versions of these textures across the mesh in a random patchwork.

I want to ask is there a setting I can select that will force the textures to adhere to their correct position?

1- This happened a few times when applying a texture on its own (but not other times, when it automatically fit it properly) 2- After successfully applying the texture, I simply added a second texture, defined it as a "Normal" in the mapping section- and while the "Normal" does appear, it does so as a tiny patchwork.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you include some screenshots? I've no idea what "tiny patchwork" is. As it stands it could be bad normals as well as inappropriate UV map. $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak Jun 17 '17 at 17:53
  • $\begingroup$ I'm afraid a screenshot wouldn't help, as it's very hard to see (and partly a hunch). Instead of the texture being wrapped around once (covering the whole model once) I'm certain I'm getting an extremely tiny version of the texture spread across the model- or, if I wanted to texture a person's face, I'm getting lots of tiny "face" textures spread over the model. $\endgroup$ – Harry Jun 21 '17 at 10:11
  • $\begingroup$ It isn't clear at least what settings of the texture you use. That said if a texture appears on the mesh somewhat unexpected (on the every mesh face as well) then there's something with the UV map. But you question is tagged with normals so I was assuming it has something to do with custom imported normals, in that case see blender.stackexchange.com/q/76513/1245 $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak Jun 21 '17 at 11:06
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Thanks for the help everyone.

It seems I've found the problem boils down to uploading the texture incorrectly.

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    $\begingroup$ In this case, as there currently is no other answer, it would be nice if you could describe (even briefly) what was incorrect and how you corrected it; this way people in the future can benefit from your experience. $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Nov 2 '17 at 2:03
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This tutorial shows a way that is probably more airtight; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQ3ZmlwBaU8

I think the problem was I used a different method to import or assign the texture.

I think this should be all.

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  • $\begingroup$ Link only answers are generally frowned on here, can you summarise what was covered on the youtube video in case it is taken down/unavailable in some regions? $\endgroup$ – Sazerac Nov 9 '17 at 4:53
  • $\begingroup$ Hi, please see my answer below. I think I've precisely identified the issue (and a few others), but please be warned, it's still not a certainty (but a probability!) $\endgroup$ – Harry Nov 15 '17 at 7:24
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(extended answer- may be useful for identifying other limitations)

To be honest I can't actually be 100% certain if this actually fixes it as it's still a finicky process and only the beginning of potential problems imported Sculptris textures bring (overall, sadly, I would simply not recommend it at all).

The immediate issue may be a difference in IMPORTING the texture as opposed to simply assigning a texture the "traditional" way via UV editor. It is possible the issue is one also imports a set of "coordinates" within Sculptris to correctly map the texture on the corresponding mesh, while the other fails due to the lack of marked seams on the UV map that Blender tends to require (resulting in a randomized mapping spread across the mesh). Of course, applying seams appears to run into a vastly greater problem that it tries to superimpose the neat 'unfolded' Blender mesh onto a fragmented Sculptris texture image- which makes the issue even worse.

Keep in mind, I haven't been able to certainly differentiate this as the issue, as it appeared to have been a random consequence the first time I used what appeared to be a similar approach each time.

BUT, to make up for the lack of decent answer to that issue, I think I may have found an answer to the UV-unwrap incompatibility; my suggestion is to try to make some duplicates of the object (low-poly ones) and flatten them so you can see a broad, flat representation of pieces of the texture, take screenshots and attempt to assemble an improvised texture using these in another program (Photoshop is an obvious choice, Krita should also do the job perfectly fine too).

BUT I regret to say the main take-away message is I STRONGLY encourage anyone who did a lot of hard work on a painted Sculptris object, to bite the bullet and start from scratch making a new Blender one, complete with a new texture. It would actually take less time and run into less problems.

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    $\begingroup$ Just to be clear, there isn't really anything WRONG with Blender; it's simply a matter of its traditional "unwrap" mapping approach is largely incompatible with Sculptris' more randomized mapping approach. This issue is unfortunately the tip of the iceberg, and I would say, your ability to use an imported Sculptris mesh will be severely limited without an extreme level of improvisation that actually outweighs the effort of learning to make the whole thing in Blender... from scratch. Sorry everyone. $\endgroup$ – Harry Nov 15 '17 at 7:26
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I solved it (to an extent)

The problem is that the imported Scultrpis OBJECTS are corrupt and retain their incompatible mapping code. IF you duplicate the vertices and make a new object this seems to overcome a lot of problems.

Solution here in more detail. Not a silver bullet, but it helps :)

Converting Sculptris into Blender SOLVED (possibly).

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