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This question already has an answer here:

I have an animation where a cube goes from point A to B. When it reaches B, he will be out of sight from the camera.

How can I make a "cut", a.k.a., make the camera now show point B, where the cube is?

Kind of like transition from Scene 1 over to Scene 2; I don't have any scenes, though.

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marked as duplicate by cegaton, Timaroberts, p2or, JakeD, David Apr 13 '17 at 11:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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A way to do this is to use multiple cameras. Create multiple cameras with the views that you want. To switch the views, you have to create "Markers" in the Timeline. In the Timeline, go to the first frame of your animation. With your mouse hovering over the Timeline, press M. The creates a Marker at Frame 1. It looks like a little orange triangle:

enter image description here

Select the camera you want to be active. While keeping your cursor over the Timeline, press Ctrl + B to Bind the camera to the selected marker. Next, go to the frame you want to switch cameras at. Press M to add a second marker. Select your new active camera and your new marker. Press Ctrl + B in the Timeline to bind your second camera. Repeat as necessary.

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One solution outlined by Jayanam is to animate the position and rotation of the camera. The trick is that you will probably have to go into the Curves editor and switch the interpolation of the keyframes to CONSTANT, otherwise the camera will move instead of standing still with a jump at the keyframe.

Another solution is to have separate scenes. Blender files can contain multiple scenes, each with their own camera and time line. Because the time lines are independent, this is usually the best choice. That way if you have to stretch out one scene, it doesn't force you to audit the other scenes to make sure their keyframes are still right.

You could also have multiple independent blender files and use linking to share meshes between them (or appending if dealing with the restrictions of a linked mesh become inconvenient).

After you have created several different scenes you can glue the rendered PNGs together in the VSE (again, in its own scene) to make the final video.

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