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I created a kind of procedural modeled ground (rocks desert like), with some decimate modifiers to have a really crazy topology.

The result is nice, except for some ngons faces that contains some weird normals, due to the elevation difference of several vertices:

enter image description here

How to avoid this? My first guess is to "flatten the face, but I can't figure out the way to do this operation.

I must specify that the face is not perpendicular to the Z axis, so a zero-Z-scaling (S Z 0) won't work here.

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4 Answers 4

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You can scale along the normal.

Set the Transform orientation to Normal in 3D view > Header:

enter image description here

Then press SZZ0.

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    $\begingroup$ so useful! I have spent hundreds of hours in Blender without knowing that was possible. $\endgroup$
    – Steve
    Jan 8, 2017 at 22:52
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Since version 2.76 there is a flatten faces tool:

Mesh -> Cleanup -> Make Planar Faces

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You can also use the flatten tool. This tool is part of an add-on that comes bundeled with blender. It is called "Loop Tools"

enter image description here

You can invoke it by going to the loops tools in the specials menu, W -> Loop Tools -> Flatten. enter image description here

You can enable it in the user preferences:

  1. Ctrl Alt U

  2. go to the Addon Tab

  3. Search for "Loop Tools"

  4. Enable it by ticking the checkmark

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ This one works to flatten any surface even on angles, while the others above this post only seem to work when directly on the ground. Maybe I couldn't figure out the others but this one solved my issue and is great for cleaning a messy mesh while retaining rotations. Thanks for the tip! $\endgroup$ Oct 9, 2017 at 21:37
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A simpler approach to the first answer would be, go to Object Properties -> Scale. And change the x y z value to 0 according to your needs.

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