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I have this: enter image description here

And want this, but also with thickness (not shown in photo): curved plane with faces

(1) Is there a reasonable way to create it with editable faces and (2) have it be a slightly thick, 3d object without collisions along the edges? I tried doing a Boolean modifier for the faces, however, I could not subdivide or loop cut any at all. I am not sure if it is because the vertices on either sides of each "wave" are in much different places.

(3) Finally, it would be nice not to have a zillion subdivisions on the faces or loop cuts along the wave, while maintaining the smoothness.

I created the curved plane using a Path and Bezier curve. I think I could just solidify the curve and then try to fit a seperate polygon along the walls, but this doesn't seem proper.

Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

EDIT: clarified question

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In case like this it might be easier to continue using curve object for modeling and convert it to mesh once the wave is completed.

Bezier curve objects can be filled to become flat surfaces. It's possible though to do that only when their shape is set to be 2D, i.e. positon of control points is constrained to their local XY axes. You still can rotate curve in Object mode though.

So grab your curve which was used for wave creating, set its Shape option to 2D and rotate as needed in Object mode. Note - it is important to do that in Object mode as rotating in Edit mode will actually create straight line because movement of control points is constrained by 2 axes.

wave-curve-screenshot

To give curve thickness use Extrude option in the Properties editor > Object Data tab > Geometry rollout. To control resolution use Preview U option in the Shape rollout.

wave-curve-extruded-scr

Once you use everything possible of the curve you can convert it to mesh. Note that most likely you'll need to retopologize the mesh as converted curves often have topology not suitable for anything like later subdivision or beveling.

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Looking at your image, I believe Numpad-3 will show your wave from the side.
After that, you may have to tap Numpad-5 to toggle into Right Ortho view.

Edit mode. A to de-select everything.
Turn off occlude Occlude Geometry.

C for Circle select. Color in one wave, then Right-click to finalize selection.

Mesh > Vertices > Convex Hull
This will quickly fill in one wave.

A to de-select all.

Do the exact same thing for the remaining waves.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks, but when I try that, it creates a triangle and ends up cutting through the curve. Only the top portion is rounded correctly. Also, I see a lot of sharp, uneven divisions along the "hypotenuse". $\endgroup$ – brchan Mar 25 '17 at 15:31
  • $\begingroup$ You'll have to use smaller divisions of the wave then. It should fill the majority of the crest easy enough. Just be sure to only select a few points at a time to fill at the lower end of the wave. $\endgroup$ – Doyousketch2 Mar 25 '17 at 22:32
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I don't know if I fully understand what you wish to achieve, but if you wish to get this:

enter image description here

you could start selecting the two start/end edges from a "wave":

enter image description here

then you could press F to get a solid face, but not subdivided.

enter image description here

then, if you wish to subdivide it the same as those edges, you can just press CTRLT to triangulate that single n-gon face:

enter image description here

and then ALTJ to convert all triangles to quads:

enter image description here

Another different way would be easier, using snapping. After activating vertex snapping (see the red circle), start selecting just one edge:

enter image description here

then extrude the edge and drag it towards to the other edge:

enter image description here

your edge will snap easily where you wish. But remember that you should remove doubles there, after, since you brought extruded vertices exactly over the target edge's vertices.

enter image description here

Or, maybe I didn't understand, and you wish some other result: please clarify it editing the question...

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the reply, I updated the question. Apologies for any confusion. $\endgroup$ – brchan Mar 25 '17 at 15:17

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