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enter image description hereI believe and expect that when I use a mesh as a light emitter that the mesh will project light from the mesh in 360 degrees, on all 3 axises. I'm using a cube as a light emitter and it appears that there is light falloff to the right of the cube, as if something was blocking the light and casting a shadow. It's as if the emitter is only projecting in 180 degrees. If I move the cube (on any of the 3 axises) the falloff, or shadow, moves with it. I've tried different meshes for emitters, spheres, planes, etc. but I always get the falloff. I would appreciate it very much if someone can guide me in the right direction to get the full 360 degrees emitted without any 'shadows'. The screen shot below illustrates my problem. The brightest area of the light patch on the floor is near the top side of the illuminated area. I would expect that the brightest area would be in the center of the illuminated area. In the screen shot, I have turned off the visibility of the emitter. Fyi, the objects being illuminated from below are glass bowls. Thank you! mesh light emitter does not project in 360 degrees

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  • $\begingroup$ Please edit your question and provide more details like a scene screenshot showing your objects, your lighting setup, your render settings and most importantly you emission shader node setup. $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos Mar 22 '17 at 18:39
  • $\begingroup$ The light looks like it is "Falling Off" evenly to me. There is more distance in your image to the right of your emitter so you see more Fall Off. Increase the size of the emitter and/or add another light(s). $\endgroup$ – Dontwalk Mar 24 '17 at 11:49
  • $\begingroup$ thanks Dontwalk, but I'm afraid you and I see two different things. To me. the brightest spot of the illumination is not centered in the light beam, it is off to one side. Increasing the size of the emitter won't work: I have to keep the illuminated area as small as possible. Adding more lights won't work: although I will be adding more lights, each has to be carefully controlled to illuminate the bottom of the glass bowls individually without blasting the whole area in light. To me, the problem is still that I am getting an uneven illumination. $\endgroup$ – TDolle Mar 25 '17 at 6:47

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