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So I've made a 2x2 wooden floor, using normal maps, reflection maps... just so when I would need that wooden floor to use in an interior scene, I could just import it without having to spend another hour on the node editor to get all the numbers just right.

So I made a plane, UV unwrapped it, went to the node editor, and imported all the different maps (normal, displacement, gloss, refl...). Now I have the finished product but I want to import it in a different blender file. Is there a way to do this?

Thanks in advance.

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For most things, there are multiple ways to complete them in Blender, and importing a material is one of them. The procedure outlined by Zac Perry in his answer above certainly works, but if you are wanting to append just a material, an alternate method is to do steps 1 through 4 as Zac outlines them in his answer, but in step 5, instead of going to the object folder, and appending the object, you can go to the material folder, and append the material.

In the same manner, if you wanted just to append a texture from one file to another, and assign it in the new file to a different material, you can do that by navigating to the texture folder, and appending it from there.

Both of these (and for that matter, appending an object as suggested by Zac) become orders of magntitude easier if one takes the time to give meaningful names to objects, materials, and textures, and for that matter, to meshes, too.

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These are the steps.

  1. Save your completed blender file,
  2. Create a new blender Scene, goto File > New.
  3. Goto File > Append.
  4. Navigate to the blend file containing the completed model
  5. Browse and goto object folder, and import the objects you want.

Note: You will need to know the name of the object you are importing, as there is no visual aid in identifying the model except for its name.

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    $\begingroup$ just a minor, but important point: what you describe in your step two is not merely a new Blender "scene", but a new Blender file. In fact, one file can contain multiple scenes, and you need not have a new file to have a new scene, but the steps you describe do create a new scene, but only because you've also.created a new file. $\endgroup$ – brasshat Mar 18 '17 at 19:09

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