1
$\begingroup$

I imported this object from an .stl file which I created in SolidWorks. I need to export it in a .raw format for further use. But the object is a bit too angular. Is there any way I can smooth it out using blender?

photo of the object

Thank you

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

  1. In the object mode select the object then there is option "subdivide surface" in the "Add Modifier", as shown in figure at right by red color point 1, after selecting it,

  2. Click the view untill "view 2" as you can see I have View 1 in point 2 written in red color

  3. At left you will see the smooth the press that smooth option

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I was looking for something like this! Thank you. $\endgroup$ – menrva Mar 8 '17 at 11:19
  • $\begingroup$ This will introduce far more geometry than is needed. See my answer below for a better approach. $\endgroup$ – JakeD Mar 8 '17 at 14:01
  • $\begingroup$ Even if you don't want to do this much just go to "object mode" select your object then just click "smooth" at left. No much work needed. BTW I am new to blend therefore provided you what I used with my experience. ;-) Thanks @pycoder, this is really good to know!! $\endgroup$ – Prashant Tomar Mar 8 '17 at 18:47
2
$\begingroup$

There is no need to introduce additional geometry here. Use smooth shading, then turn on auto smooth in the mesh settings.

enter image description here

Download the blend file

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think that would work. The file is going to be exported as a .raw file which doesn't support smooth shading, let alone Auto Smooth. $\endgroup$ – Scott Milner Mar 8 '17 at 23:18
  • $\begingroup$ @ScottMilner Just adding geometry is not the correct way to accomplish this. If you are sure that the .raw format doesn't support normals, then the proper solution would be to adapt the shader used to render it from the end of whatever imports it. The "more geometry" solution won't fix the problem...it just makes it look better. Incidentally, the other answer uses smooth shading as well ;-) $\endgroup$ – JakeD Mar 9 '17 at 2:50
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure what @menrva's purpose with this is, but the .raw file is just a list of 10 numbers per face: three coordinate points and a normal vector per triangle. If they are wanting to render it, then your solution would be fine. For 3D printing, though, more geometry is the only solution. Also, smooth shading doesn't change the outline of an object, and the sharp edges could still be seen in close up rendering. $\endgroup$ – Scott Milner Mar 9 '17 at 4:25
  • $\begingroup$ @ScottMilner Interesting about the .raw format...I've never used it before. Regarding 3D printing, that is correct, but the two scenarios that you gave are very specialized, so my answer still works as a way to do this. On the other hand, a plain subsurf modifier will not have the correct form at all. You need bevel or edge split, etc. to make it work. $\endgroup$ – JakeD Mar 9 '17 at 12:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.