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I have a plane that I have been trying to fracture (similar to the way glass can break). I used the grease pencil and solidify modifier with the default settings.

For some reason, when I use cell fracture it causes the faces of the shards to have convex surfaces rather than flat like the plane had. How do I get them to look flat? I tried using the debug boolean option which produced the look I want, but the shards seemed to disappear into thin air when I apply active physics to them.

Here's the pic of my results:

enter image description here

These are my settings:

enter image description here

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Here is the .blend:

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You could try out the Fracture Modifier Build.

Make sure to use the "latest development build", or just use the more recent graphicall build.

I also had to edit 3 points or so of the greasepencil strokes, because the FM (fracture modifier) created some holes in the mesh there (points were too close to each other)

For the simulation I made the bullet a trigger and the plane animated and triggered. Furthermore I played a bit around with constraints.

If you have further questions, please post either here on stackexchange or here :

https://blenderartists.org/forum/showthread.php?343637-Custom-Build-Blender-Fracture-Modifier

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  • $\begingroup$ I wasn't able to install the add-on for some reason. I see though that it comes built in to one of the latest versions of blender from your links. I'll have to try that. $\endgroup$ – lakerice Feb 17 '17 at 18:57
  • $\begingroup$ well, technically it is a standalone build of blender. It involved lots of changes in the C source code. there is an optional addon bundled with this build, but only to automate things a bit within this build, regarding to FM. $\endgroup$ – scorpion81 Feb 18 '17 at 6:54
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Turns out that the problem was that the solidify modifier was too thin for the plane. By increasing it slightly, cell fracture produced the desired normal flat faces.

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