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I want to make a model look like a low poly count, very detail lacking figure such as like this:

enter image description here

Very much resembling mid to late nineties 3-D polygonal model formats that were run in games on consoles like PS1, N64.

If you could have a look and entail, what steps should I take to design a model similar to those?

Or like this, for a better overview:

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ not sure what you need to know, do you know how to model? $\endgroup$ – zeffii Jun 8 '13 at 21:22
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    $\begingroup$ @zeffii The question was very close to being off-topic but as he didn't ask for explicit instructions, it couldn't hurt to give some pointers. We also need some initial questions like these as an example of questions not to ask. $\endgroup$ – iKlsR Jun 8 '13 at 21:27
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It would seem you want to create low-poly art. The best way to do this is to actually model these objects to achieve this look and quality and then texture them.

No amount of modifiers or tricks will get the same unique look. Also using modifiers can make animating, texturing or rigging very difficult and also destroy your mesh topology something that is key in lowpoly style characters/objects.

The Decimate modifier might be of some help though, it can reduce mesh geometry but it is not very flexible and generally unpredictable in how it does this when used on complex objects.

Also as bummzack points out below, alot of the detail say you see on low-poly models is mostly from the texture(s).

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  • $\begingroup$ You might want to add that these models usually also use quite small textures (256x256 or even smaller) and don't have sophisticated lighting modes (mostly it's just flat- or Gouraud-shading with pre-baked or pre-painted lighting). A lot of the details actually are part of the texture and not the model... $\endgroup$ – bummzack Jun 9 '13 at 10:45
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What i did here is use the images provided as a background image, then trace around them by extruding a vertex.

enter image description here

Then in sideview / orthographic pull and push the internal vertices to give the character some body.

enter image description here

If you don't already know how to model, or use blender, these low poly characters are great things to practice.

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  • $\begingroup$ i'll leave it like this because the OP hasn't come back to respond to any of the comments. There's little point in answering the questions we think they should be asking.. i did the lowpoly out of curiosity $\endgroup$ – zeffii Jun 9 '13 at 18:38
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First off, FF7 used a stencil buffer implemented on the PS1's video hardware.

Second, as mentioned, low-pixel count textures.

Third, low-poly count as you already stated.

That leaves pretty much everything up to you.

If you wanted advice on how to specifically render a model similar to one you'd seen on FF7, here are some relevant sources that may help you get an understanding of both the model file format, compression, and layout:

http://q-gears.sourceforge.net/gears.pdf

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mw9mEMep3F8

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  • $\begingroup$ I just want to say how cool this answer is. $\endgroup$ – Wray Bowling Jun 24 '13 at 18:51

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