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So, I know this is probably something that would better fit with a full-blown CAD program, but I love Blender, and I know Blender is capable of this sort of thing, I just don't know how to go about it. What I'd like to simulate is a mechanical object and its movements. The machine is composed of two arms extending form an axle which rotates. Each arm also has two mini-axle extensions which also rotate. I'd like to be able to simulate the forces at work (more notably, the centrifugal and centripetal forces) to see if this mechanism produces the gyroscopic forces I think it will. Is there a physics library or plugin anyone can recommend? Also, I expect this to be a fairly straining machine in the real-world, and would like to simulate the stress on the materials. Thanks :)

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marked as duplicate by gandalf3, iKlsR Aug 24 '14 at 22:12

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  • $\begingroup$ Blender does have a rigidbody physics simulator in both the 3D view and the BGE (using the bullet library), but they are meant more for "artistic" simulations. $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Feb 24 '14 at 19:36
  • $\begingroup$ yeah, that's what I was afraid of - welp, I've been looking for a python project to start :) $\endgroup$ – CreationTribe Feb 24 '14 at 20:13
  • $\begingroup$ You can query the linear velocity and angular velocity for your objects at any time. Is that enough to compute the centripetal forces? $\endgroup$ – Mike Pan Mar 27 '14 at 0:39
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    $\begingroup$ on that note, i wouldnt mind seeing blender diversify like that... a render mode called "BlenderCAD" would bring tears of joy =) $\endgroup$ – Konner Rasmussen Mar 27 '14 at 0:40
  • $\begingroup$ As far as I know bullet is mainly a physic engine for games. It is fast, but probably not accurate enough for engineering applications (see this question). $\endgroup$ – maddin45 Apr 25 '14 at 23:45
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Blender is very effective in representing physical simulations, it has many options and virtually total control of Bullet.

But I've never seen that these "representations" can extract physical data on the forces involved in each simulation. Blender has no options for that, to my knowledge, I hope to be wrong.

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