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Let's say that I want to model the interior of a house, inside the house. By this I mean that I have a scene where the outside of the house is modelled but the inside of the house also needs to be modelled. What is the practical method to do this?

What is a practical/accepted method of doing this?

Should I cut away some of the walls? (but then, how do I render from a viewpoint that should include the walls that have been cut away?)

Is there some other clever method to do this?

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to the site. You'd model the interior of a house using the same basic modeling techniques as you'd use to model the exterior. $\endgroup$ – brasshat Feb 6 '17 at 19:55
  • $\begingroup$ I'm delaying a more detailed answer pending more information about exactly what you are wanting to model the interior for. Is this for a game, where you intend for a character to open a door (or window, or walk through a wall) and enter a room? Or do you intend this for creating a model of a house and use it for a virtual tour/ Or is this for a technical illustration where you want views of the interior to be unobstructed by the exterior? The three techniques might need different techniques in staging, lighting, and camera placement, besides slightly different modeling techniques. $\endgroup$ – brasshat Feb 6 '17 at 19:55
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You can set the house's max draw type to wireframe and disable selection in the 3dview port. This way you will only see the outline of the house and will be unable to select it, so it won't get in the way as you work on the rooms, but you can still visually position items so they are within the house. You may also want to use an object for the walls of each room and do the same for each one.

object display settings

diable selection

Also consider that you may not have to model everything in the location that it would exist in the real world. If you are planning a shot where the camera moves from the porch, through the front door into the lounge, then you might want them together. If you are going to have one shot outside the house and another later shot inside a room in the house, both locations can be completely disconnected.

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I'm not sure what exactly you are trying to do but I think this might help:

You can "hide" the walls by selecting them and pressing "H". Then you can place your models inside the building. Also, you can make use of the "Wireframe" mode. Just press "Z".

I hope this helped. :)

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So to my mind your question addresses two fundamental things:

  1. Creating your set
  2. Positioning your camera in that set.

For the first, I think you understand the difference in between an ext and int shot, and how they are typically lit differently. So rather than think of as one setup where you can do everything, think about how you are rendering the shots within the scene. You might need two scenes. So maybe you have a mesh/model of the exterior, lit with a sunset type setup (using the Sun type lamp). You have another model that's the same basic model bit with a wall deleted as you said and the interior lit with some Hemi and Spot type setups.

For the second (the camera) remember the camera has all kind of settings such as tense distance (so it doesn't render stuff really far away), focal length, lens length, etc. You can change these settings for different shots (or Scenes in Blender). So for an interior shot you might use a more "fisheye" wide angle lens (a shorter lens length) to capture everything. This might give you more "room to work" on your interior shots.

Try the two scene setup and see if it works for you.

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  • $\begingroup$ Would it not be possible to set up the lighting in such a way that the exterior light (sun) would also create the correct lighting for the interior scene? (just asking, I'm really new to Blender, so I may very well be asking stupid questions). $\endgroup$ – Jacco Feb 4 '17 at 22:37
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, you do that. You can also just set ambient light (in the world tab I think) to a high number and that will make a scene bright inside and outside. It kinda depends on the style you are going for, realistic or cartoony. Cartoons are often often evenly everywhere with just a few pronounced shadows, it's a cleaner look. Addressing your question you'll be modeling both either way anyway, right? $\endgroup$ – J Rowoldt Feb 4 '17 at 22:53

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