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I'm trying to scale a cyllinder, but keep 1 side the same, like in the image. You can see there that a cyllinder (represented by a black rectangle) has a certain size, but I want to make it uneven, like a cone that does not end in a closed point. Just a cyllinder with one wide end and one narrow end, represented by the red lines. You can see a wide and narrow/normal end. ]

How do I do that?

Thanks in advance,

DiaborMagics

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ If you are modelling with any kind of more exotic object, like point clouds or whatever. This would be the solution: youtube.com/watch?v=YBvA2Hduk_w $\endgroup$
    – Bugmansia
    Dec 19 '18 at 3:28
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You can use Proportional Editing for that. Go into Edit mode and enable Proportional Editing (the button in the toolbar at the bottom - click it and set 'Enabled') and set it to Linear mode (the selection will appear once you've enabled Proportional Editing). It should look like this :

proportional editing

Then select the vertices at the end of the mesh that you want to scale. Press S to scale. Drag them to the size you want and then scroll the mouse wheel (or equivalent) to change the range of the proportional edit tool until you have the desired influence.

scaled

I've purposefully used a cylinder with a number of loop cuts in the image above to demonstrate how the rest of the mesh is affected by the proportional edit.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks a lot! I'm going to try this! EDIT: Perfect! Thank you! Works like a charm! $\endgroup$ Jan 20 '17 at 15:39
  • $\begingroup$ Fantastic - glad to help. Don't forget to Accept the answer by clicking the tick. $\endgroup$ Jan 20 '17 at 16:21
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For Blender 2.8+ the interface changed, the Proportional Edit button has moved near the top center of the interface:

This is what it should look like after setting it properly enter image description here

Remember to turn back off once done.

Simply selecting a face and scaling it, is perfectly appropriate where there are single faces for the sides of an object (such as a simple cylindrical primitive) between the ends of an object one is trying to proportionately scale.

However, the moment one introduces something like a loop cut in the middle of that, as was nicely exemplified in the pic for the first answer, simply scaling normally would only affect the mesh between the side one is scaling and the edges formed by the closest loop cut to it, not the whole mesh.

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Tab into edit mode, select the top or bottom face and hit S to scale.

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