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How can I connect a set of disconnected vertices with a line through all of them? I tried V but it shows the error of "cannot rip multiple disconnected vertices" F just creates a face but I would like to have a line "connect vertice path" gives "invalid selection order" "connect vertice" doesn't show any change

points displayed in blender

What can I do? Appreciate all your help. Thanks guys

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  • $\begingroup$ select 1st top vertex and hold ctrl and select the same line bottom vertex and press f same way other side and u will get a L shape $\endgroup$ – atek Jan 13 '17 at 15:43
  • $\begingroup$ Could you please accept and upvote the answer if it was helpful? $\endgroup$ – Tak Jan 26 '17 at 13:14
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Select two vertices and create an edge between them, repeat for each edge you want.

With two vertices selected blender will create an edge, with three or more vertices it will create an edge between each vertex as well as a face that is surrounded by all of them. If the vertices are aligned the face will be too small to be seen even though it is there.

You could select the vertices from one end to the other and create a face, then use X->Only Faces to only have edges, but this will still leave an extra edge from the first to last, and the remaining edges will only be worthwhile if you select them one by one in the right order, if you use select all then you can get edges between random vertices in the row.

This is a drawback of using the same operator to create edges and faces, the number of selected vertices is the only factor that decides if a face is created, so to create only edges you need to select two vertices and create one edge at a time. As you may want to create edges between all the vertices you have in the grid, you may want to fill in the grid with faces (enabling the F2 addon might help), then select everything and delete only faces to have only edges remaining.

If you enable vertex snapping and auto-merge you could select the first vertex and press E to extrude it and snap the new vertex to the next vertex, then repeat for each edge.

auto merge option

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  1. Enter edit mode
  2. select two vertices or more that are on a straight line using Shift+Right Click.
  3. Hit F and the vertices will be connected with an edge.

Note: if the selected vertices are not on a straight line a face will be created. To avoid this, first connect the vertices that are on a straight line, then select the last vertex and connect it with the vertex not in the straight line.

As shown below I have four vertices one of them with an angle (not in a straight line):

enter image description here

If I selected all of them then hit F a face will be created as shown below:

enter image description here

To avoid this, I selected the vertices on the same line, then hit F as shown below then I selected the nearest vertex to the last one and hit F:

enter image description here

enter image description here

And this will give you the required result as shown:

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Actually with three verts selected F will create a face - even though you cannot see it while the verts are aligned. $\endgroup$ – sambler Jan 14 '17 at 16:45
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Thanks guy for your extensive answers. unfortunately this doesn't resolve my problem. I'm actually aware about the "F" function and how it works with three vertices ... the challenge is way more that I have thousands of points like the ones shown in the very first image that are allways more or less in a vertical row and that I would like to connect efficently without having to select allways just 2 at a time. Thanks for your efford :)

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In your given image it's look simple just select all vertices and press F If you are working on large projects then you need automatic jointer magnet button is also helpful

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  • $\begingroup$ I think "automatic jointer" in this context should be a monkey which will sit at your computer and connect vertices selecting them one by one. $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak Feb 26 '17 at 10:08

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