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I would like to reproduce the effects of light's finite speeds. So an object that is far away will be rendered as if it were still in a position that it was in previously.

For example, to create a realistic scene in space, the light from some objects will take a few seconds to reach the camera. A given object should therefore appear as it appeared in the scene (fps)*(Z/c) frames ago, where c is the speed of light and Z is the distance from the camera.

Some examples of what I mean:

Visual: VSauce Distortions

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean that objects far away should be rendered as they appeared a few frames ago (or even more frames ago for very far distances)? Like what happens with the sun (which appears in a different position to a camera/eye than it actually is). The rolling shutter effect is unrelated to the speed of light, so could you clarify what you're asking about? $\endgroup$ – Garrett Feb 15 '14 at 9:03
  • $\begingroup$ I was talking about how the further something is away, you would see what happened a few frames ago. The rolling shutter effect was just the best example I could think of. $\endgroup$ – Tyler Scott Feb 15 '14 at 21:31
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    $\begingroup$ I think your question was very interesting. I edited it to attempt to clarify it. If you don't feel it still accurately describes your question, you should make some additional edits. $\endgroup$ – Garrett Feb 16 '14 at 2:58
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I don't have a Blender related answer but if you are comfortable coding you can have a look at the OpenRelativity opensource toolkit created at MIT. There is a demo program available their gamelab website called A Slower Speed of Light.

Here's the current link. If the link goes down in the future you are all free to edit this answer. http://gamelab.mit.edu/games/a-slower-speed-of-light/

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  • $\begingroup$ This looks like a cool idea but not exactly what I was looking for. I may implement my own game that has light bending in the future but for now I am just looking to see what it looks like. $\endgroup$ – Tyler Scott Feb 21 '14 at 0:03
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Isnt the result of distant light, arriving from an earlier event that it changes frequency? That is red shifts. Alternitively perhaps you could isolate the reference frame with layers and duplicate the animation so that the distant animation can be composited with a time delay. That is local frame animation on layer one, scene one. Distant frame animation on layer two, scene one. Animate together. Duplicate all layers to scene two. Render both.

Composite foreground scene one onto background or distant scene two layer two. Delay frame offset value of image sequence.

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    $\begingroup$ Just a physics digression: Red shifts only occur when an object is moving away from the observer, independent of how far away it is. You might be thinking of Hubble's Law which says that for our universe, a very far away object's distance from us tends to be proportional to its velocity away from us. $\endgroup$ – Garrett Feb 18 '14 at 1:07
  • $\begingroup$ This seems like the best idea but only gives two levels of lag. For instance if I wanted to spin a galaxy how would the layers work? (New link in my question) $\endgroup$ – Tyler Scott Feb 21 '14 at 0:04
  • $\begingroup$ Blue shift happens when the object is moving closer. Increased frequency. $\endgroup$ – MarcClintDion Feb 21 '14 at 1:56

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