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I've got a logo I'm making in Blender and Illustrator. I am currently arranging the logo in Illustrator and then I save it as an SVG and import that to Blender where I extrude it.

But the process of converting it from Curve to Mesh in Blender makes it have a messy overly complicated mesh.

When I take the same text and extrude it as a 3D object in Illustrator it looks much much better. I grab it, and I can see a wireframe of some kind. So is it not possible to just export this mesh created by Illustrator, and skip the step of converting to SVG and importing it into Blender and then converting it to Mesh? It seems like it would result in a much cleaner mesh if that were possible.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm not aware of Illustrator having the capability to export as a 3D file format, but that kind of question has been asked on the Adobe forum . At Blender StackExchange we can suggest how best to turn 2d Vector files into 3D. $\endgroup$ – zeffii Sep 25 '16 at 9:17
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because , the way this is phrased is a question about a feature of Adobe Illustrator export types and not Blender. $\endgroup$ – zeffii Oct 7 '16 at 8:41
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I'm guessing that what you see is something like this.

enter image description here

I don't know what Illustrator is capable of, because I do not have it, and I have never used it. However, Blender can clean it up, by use of the Remesh modifier.

It has three modes, Sharp, Smooth, and Blocks. They work a bit differently, and which one you use, depends on what you want the resulting mesh to look like.

enter image description here

The Octree Depth setting sets the resolution. The Scale setting twaeks the resolution on a more fine-grained level. Smooth Shading should be self explanatory. Remove Disconnected Pieces removes small pieces of geometry that are not connected to the main mesh, and the Threshold value controls how small/big pieces get removed.
The Sharp mode also has a Sharpness setting; lowering it makes the mesh smoother and increasing it makes it sharper.

N.B. If your SVG has several unconnected parts, do not join them into a single object until after remeshing, or you will lose individual materials. Moreover, vertex groups and UV maps are not retained by the remesh.

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Say this is the result of the SVG import, it's still a Curve Object.

enter image description here

because it is still a curve object, you can do almost the same things to it as a Font Object.

Set the type of curve to 2D, you'll get more options.

enter image description here

Like Offset, Extrude and Bevel with depth, divisions. Technically if that's all you need and your shape can be bevelled nicely then you don't even need to convert to mesh or ever see the mesh.

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Simply convert the curve to a mesh before extruding, you should get an n-gon that remains intact (select 2d mesh and in edit mode select all and make a face) this way you only extrude the border and retain a quite simple mesh. In case of artifacts you can also retopologise the n-gon into quads as necessary. This should be simple and straightforward. Tutorial on this you can find on youtube searching for "import svg in blender"

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