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What is the difference between hard and soft modeling in blender? My understanding is that blender is primarily a soft modeling software program used for animation and storytelling or gaming and asset creation, and that hard modeling is best suited for cad type programs like Autodesk Revit or Inventor. Would that be an acurate statement "generally " speaking?

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  • $\begingroup$ Voting to close as opinion based as "soft" and "hard" are fairly ill-defined terms $\endgroup$ – Sazerac Jul 30 '19 at 23:47
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    $\begingroup$ He may be referring to hardsurface modeling for more geometric shapes, and subdivision based modelling for characters and deformable objects $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos Jul 31 '19 at 12:20
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It's not a question of "hard" or "soft". Blender is not a CAD software. Neither BIM. Let's take for instance Autodesk's software "Autocad" - it is CAD software. "Revit" is BIM software. "3ds MAX" and "Maya" is CG software. Each of those software categories are aiming at different goals. It's different tools for different tasks. Blender is an analogue of "3ds Max" and "Maya".

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I think this can be a trick question sometimes as no matter what you’re creating in your 3D application, it’s either going to be a hard surface or a "soft" organic mesh. According to Plurasight.com "One artist may say a hard surface model is anything machined, man-made, and organic is any living thing such as humans, animals, plants, etc. Another artist may define it as anything that deforms and is animated is considered an organic model", although "It’s important to point out that there is no right or wrong way to distinct the two". Blender is optimized for 3D animation and rendering using polygonal modeling techniques so it can be thought of as being primarily a Soft Modeling or Non Cad Software in that sense. Fot more information see the link https://www.pluralsight.com/blog/film-games/whats-the-difference-between-hard-surface-and-organic-models

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