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I've never used physics in Blender before so I just have a quick question about the workflow. I've created a chain using the Array Modifier and made sure none of the meshes are intersecting, but what I would like to do is attach the first and last link to a fixed point and let gravity work its magic. However... I have no idea where to even start. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

UPDATE: I've applied Rigid Body physics to each link and also a Constraint between each, but when I run the simulation the links just go crazy. Does anyone happen to know where I'm going wrong?:

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UPDATE 2 (final): I removed the constraints and set the shape to "Mesh" rather than "Convex Hull" and everything is working perfectly. Thanks.

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  • Step 1:
    To apply physics on objects you first need to go to the properties physics tab and enable rigid body on this object.

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  • Step 2:
    If an object has to function as a hook/pin object that has to stay at its initial place, set it to Passive.
    If an object has to to function as a dynamic physics object, set it to Active.
  • Step 3:
    Select two of the physics objects and go to the 3D viewport physics tab. Hit connect and a new rigid body constraint empty gets generate.

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  • Step 4:
    continue until the entire chain is connected. It should look sth like this:

enter image description here

  • Step 5:
    Setup the rigid body constraints of your chain.
    this part needs to be tweaked to your specific needs so there is no concrete setup. But for a generic metal chain this values should be good:

enter image description here

  • Step 6:
    Run your animation! But make sure you have enough frames in your timeline. The physics will only get calculated to this point. if it is not enough, raise the number.

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In rigidbody physics tab set "passive" and uncheck "dynamic" for fix first and last link. That's all.

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    $\begingroup$ While it is correct, please do not submit an answer like this. This method, while it may work, is not nearly as good as the above answer. Try to explain more, and perhaps include photos. $\endgroup$ – Billy S Sep 8 '16 at 2:02

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