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This question already has an answer here:

As in question title, is there a way to flat plane object affecting by proportional edit without creating new plane object?

here my image :

enter image description here

I don't know how to flat this object except create new plane object or edit position of vertex to z=0 individually.

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marked as duplicate by Shady Puck, VRM, Ray Mairlot, David Sep 6 '16 at 16:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    $\begingroup$ Select all vertices of the mesh, press S, then 0 and your mesh'll be flat. $\endgroup$ – Paul Gonet Sep 6 '16 at 13:23
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    $\begingroup$ Your question is rather unclear, however I think you want to scale along one axis? Try S and then X, Y, or Z. Note you may want a custom axis which would make it a little more difficult but possible. $\endgroup$ – VRM Sep 6 '16 at 13:40
  • $\begingroup$ I edited my question maybe with picture can explain what I want, if i scale to 0 , my object become single vertex. $\endgroup$ – Aep Saepudin Sep 6 '16 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ If you want to flatten mesh by one axis, choose it while scaling to 0 (S > axis > 0). See blender.stackexchange.com/questions/7729/… and blender.stackexchange.com/questions/33087/… $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak Sep 6 '16 at 14:09
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You can restrict the axis in which you scale to zero.

In this case, select all vertices. press:

S (to activate the scale tool)

Z (to restrict the scaling to the Z axis)

0 to bring all the vertices to the same plane)

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ thanks, it solve my problem very helpful. But i'm just curious how to tidy that vertex because the result like curve? $\endgroup$ – Aep Saepudin Sep 6 '16 at 14:49
  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean you only want to affect one of the mountains in your plane and not the rest? (If Yes, you need to do something like set the 3D cursor and scale a selection of vertices relative to that. Or, the smooth tool in sculpt mode) $\endgroup$ – tschundler Sep 6 '16 at 16:33

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