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I wanted to see what my model looked like so far in sculpt mode with the multi-resolution modifier and it looks like total garbage. I'm new to blender so my model does have a lot of overlapping vertices and edges but I'm not sure that's the reason. During my last attempt, I thought it was because the image was asymmetric so I used mirror modifier to make the model totally symmetric. I know that the model is very messy in it of itself, but I'm just trying to narrow the problem to specifics. Honestly, I have no idea what's happening.

Here's the file I'm struggling with:

Before I start from scratch AGAIN could someone give me a clue as to why this is happening?

Thanks

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    $\begingroup$ For future, when you want to show a problem with your mesh, I would suggest uploading screenshots and/or uploading your blend file to blend-exchange.giantcowfilms.com rather than making a youtube video. $\endgroup$ – Ray Mairlot Aug 12 '16 at 15:28
  • $\begingroup$ 1. Your model contains faces with normals facing the wrong direction. 2. It's hard to detect where your problem is when all you do to describe it is "model looks odd". 3. Please do not only keep Ray's advice in mind. Instead, go to blend-exchange.giantcowfilms.com, upload your file, then edit your question and post the link there. $\endgroup$ – metaphor_set Aug 12 '16 at 20:37
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Save your current scene to avoid destroying it more.

Go in to wireframe mode. (Z to jump in to solid and again for wireframe).

If your mesh is messy and have vertices inside it delete them and try to clean up your model if you have an unnecessarily rough shape. The smoother the shape is the better it will work.

enter image description here

Ignore the world node it is not relevant

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    $\begingroup$ Please use something like MS Paint to crop your screenshots to just the relevant portions. $\endgroup$ – PGmath Aug 13 '16 at 3:04
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There are 3 main issues that can cause problems for Catmull-Clark subdivision (the algorithm that both MultiRes and Subsurf use).

  1. Non-quad faces. When modeling in general try to use all quads, i.e. faces with 4 sides. Subsurf requires quads or tris (3-sided faces), so any non-quad faces will be automatically triangulated which can give undesirable results. An occasional well-placed tri can be fine, but in general stick to quads.
    enter image description here
  2. Inside geometry. Geometry inside a mesh should be avoided at all costs. Inside geometry occurs when an edge is shared by more than 2 faces. This can cause major issues for Subsurfing. (It seems to be the biggest problem in your case.)
    enter image description here
  3. Stretched faces. Try to avoid extremely non-regular faces, i.e. long, extremely non squarish or equilateral-trianglish faces. These can create some messy stretched looking and pinching in the resulting mesh. Your faces don't have to be perfect regular polygons, but long skinny faces will cause problems.
    enter image description here

As an aside, your normals are a bit messed up (indicated by the darker faces). While normals don't play a factor in Subsurfing, messed up normals can cause a lot of other problems. After removing inside geometry you should select your entire mesh and hit Ctrl+N to recalculate the normals.

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