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I'm fairly new to blender but I've write some python to import some old models from triangle data with UV texture images. Some of the models have more than mesh so each mesh has its own UV texture.

In blender would I create one object per mesh or create 2 meshes under one object (and if the latter - how is that done in python?)

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  • $\begingroup$ An object in Blender can only have one mesh associated, which can have multiple UV maps (up to 8 afaik, but only one is active). A single mesh can consist of multiple sets of linked geometry however. Edit-mode > Mesh > Vertices > Separate > By loose parts would split each set out into a separate mesh / object. Since UV coordinates and textures are separately stored in Blender, you can have differently textured parts in a single mesh - thus, combining UVs on import might be an option for you. $\endgroup$ – CoDEmanX Jan 6 '14 at 10:46
  • $\begingroup$ Ultimately I want to export them back to fbx so I can load them in XNA/MonoGame or Unity or similar. Basically out of the custom format they are in now. $\endgroup$ – MrPurpleStreak Jan 7 '14 at 19:54
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Using one object for each mesh will simplify things for you, I think. Although it is possible to have everything in one object and still use different materials, and use different UV maps, this will probably be more trouble than it's worth, especially if you're interested in using Cycles.

Note: It is possible to put "more than one" mesh in an object in Blender, but it's still treated as one mesh, they just aren't necessarily attached to each other. The "Separate > By loose parts" tool that CoDEmanX suggests takes each contiguous set of vertices and puts them each in their own object. It's convenient if you already have several things in one object that you want to be separate.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks - As Anonymouse says I can probably just parent them to one object then. $\endgroup$ – MrPurpleStreak Jan 7 '14 at 19:55
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, that's exactly the right idea. $\endgroup$ – Matt Jan 7 '14 at 20:21
  • $\begingroup$ I don't agree with this ​as I used to have issues due to the underlying architecture my import was for... The result was multiple objects forming a base shape, all sharing the same material... these objects basically held specific groups of primitives in the order desired by the architecture, and there was no symmetry to them other than the base shape they formed. $\endgroup$ – Tcll May 13 '17 at 20:02
  • $\begingroup$ To elaborate a bit on my last comment, think of a cube (12 triangles in a spiral order ), then think of that cube being made of 4 objects each holding 3 triangles. $\endgroup$ – Tcll May 13 '17 at 20:06
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One mesh in blender can have multiple materials, so you can join your input meshes into one for blender. Simply assign a separate material for each input mesh.

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  • $\begingroup$ I agree with this, for reasons explained in my comments on Matt's answer. $\endgroup$ – Tcll May 13 '17 at 20:09
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Alternatively, it sounds like it would be useful for you to import them all as separate objects and then parent one to all the others. That way, the parent will behave as if all of the smaller objects were one object.

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