0
$\begingroup$

I have a basic .obj of man from which I made a bmesh. I want to widen his hips. I'm a big Blender noob (and most of the work I've done with Blender has been rudimentary python scripting) so I don't know how to go about doing this.

Do I translate a vertex group of each leg a bit further out, then translate the vertices of his hips to make it look natural? Do I extrude something? Also, once I do that, should I use a vector smoothing function to make it look less awkward? (I know that bmesh has at least two such functions, and it seems to add vertices from the .obj to the mesh -- on the order of thousands -- to automatically create a smoother mesh.)

If the answer is obvious, I apologize for my noobishness. If my question doesn't make any sense or I've left out vital information, please let me know.

Thanks!

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ The vital information you have left out is a informative screen shot showing the 3D View and other well considered items. In reference to your writing .... [I've left out vital information] $\endgroup$ Aug 2, 2016 at 6:05
  • $\begingroup$ Search proportional editing or see the right hand side of the page listing ... Related. $\endgroup$ Aug 2, 2016 at 7:09
  • $\begingroup$ @atomicbezierslinger thanks! I just asked a new question and made sure to document in it the sort of information you pointed out I'm missing here. $\endgroup$
    – Jack Lynch
    Aug 5, 2016 at 6:34

1 Answer 1

2
$\begingroup$

Several possible technics to do that. Of course you can move each vertex manually, but here are some possibilities that can help you (between probably many others).

  • Edit mode and proportional editing

Mainly two situations. Your object is mirrored or not. If it is not, you can make it mirrored (removing half of it and add a mirror modifier) or use the mirror option in the tools panel on the left here :

enter image description here

As you start from an obj file. I think yours is not mirrored but is symmetrical.

  • Enter edit mode Tab
  • Enable proportional editing
  • Select a vertex (or more) and move it
  • Use the mouse wheel or the PgUp and PgDown keys you can play on the influence of the proportional editing mode and so move more or less the neighbors vertices

enter image description here

Other useful thing in edit mode 'smooth vertex' :

enter image description here

  • Sculpting

Enter sculpt mode and check that the symmetry is set (normally it is by default) :

enter image description here

Then use the brushes and sculpt ! I think you may prefer the following brushes 'draw', 'grab', 'smooth'... but test which is the best for you. The F key allows you to modify the size of your brush.

enter image description here

  • Mesh deform

Mesh deform is a modifier. It can be interesting as it gives you the ability to deform a mesh using a more simple one.

To set it up, you'll need to make a close shape that bounds your model. And probably give it some cut in order to have some handling points. And stretch the cube to be relatively close to your model. Here I use a cube with some subdivisions and set its maximum draw type to 'wire' so that you can see your model through it :

enter image description here

Next select your mesh, go to the modifiers panel, choose a 'mesh deform' and set the cube as deform object. Then click 'bind' (Blender will calculate a bit at this step) :

enter image description here

Once done, select the cube, enter edit mode and play with its geometry :

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you so much. Wow. I had no idea someone would take this much time to answer. That's so considerate.I will use this tomorrow and get back to you with any questions. Again -- wow -- thanks! $\endgroup$
    – Jack Lynch
    Aug 3, 2016 at 3:35
  • $\begingroup$ Looks like this is everything I need. I will probably be using some of the equivalent functions in python (assuming they exist; so far I haven't been able to find a function that doesn't have a bpy/bmesh analogue). You have saved me so much time and quite possibly saved my project from learning-curve doom $\endgroup$
    – Jack Lynch
    Aug 3, 2016 at 3:39

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .