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I noticed due to the parenting system of Blender Child Of constraint does not modify the object's location/rotation in such a way we can copy or interact with it.

So when you drop influence of Child Of constraint, the object snaps back to it's original location as seen before instead of simply being suspended in the location it was guided to by the constraint.

The problem is this: How do I get an object to release it's child into mid-air, so to speak, so that physics can take over cause the object to drop?

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I assume you are creating an animation ? In that case, a trick you can use is just to set the position of your object at the exact position it was before, on the frame you drop the influence option to zero. Then, if you run a physics simulation, I think it should work.

Let me know if you have any question !

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm unclear for sure. Object starts out on floor. ChildOf lifts it to air. I set ChildOf influence to 0, then it sticks to ground. If I have a copyRot/Loc at the upper location, it seems irrelevant since same glitch applies. I've tried various keyframes at various points (up, down) and no good results. $\endgroup$
    – Pipsqweek
    Aug 1 '16 at 7:53
  • $\begingroup$ Why don't you set it back to its position by marking it before with the 3D cursor (Shift+S->Cursor to selected) and then, once the influence is set to zero, you put it back there (Shift+S->Selected to cursor) and you add a keyframe ? $\endgroup$
    – R. Hidra
    Aug 1 '16 at 8:54
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How about having its "at rest" point at the place where it's dropped, then have two Copy Location constraints - one with the "bird" (or whatever) and the other to an empty at the point on the ground. At the start the "ground" influence is 1 and bird is zero (locking it to that point on the ground), when it's picked up transition "ground" to zero and "bird" to 1 (locking it to the bird), when it's dropped, transition "bird" to zero and it should return to its point of rest (in the air, where it already is) and then simply enable the physics to allow it to fall. It seems to work but is a bit fiddly getting the locations right for clean transitions.

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