2
$\begingroup$

When I press Shift+C (following a tutorial by the way) my view center is not at the 0, 0, 0 it's way off.

Image should describe (after pressing 7 I'd want the top down view to be on the cube).

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
1
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ As far as I know, shift+C is supposed to bring the 3D cursor to the center AND show you all objects... so the center wont be at the center, depending of the objects in your scene $\endgroup$
    – lemon
    Commented Jul 18, 2016 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

2
$\begingroup$

Well, a short answer : Alt+Home brings the 3D cursor to the center of the view.

So :

  • Shif+C
  • and then Alt+Home
$\endgroup$
0
5
$\begingroup$

It's because Shift+C doesn't center the view, it shows all objects in the scene, kind of like Home does.

So, because you have a cube at the center, but a camera off to one side, Blender is going to show you both and the view won't be centered on the origin.

Shift+C does move the 3D cursor to the origin, though.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

As has already been explained, Shift + C centers the view on all objects.

Alt + Home works, but I also suggest using NUMPAD . to center your view on the currently selected object.

It's a shortcut you'll probably find yourself using more often, because it lets you quickly focus on the necessary parts. It's also useful in edit mode, to center the view on any selected vertices/edges/faces.

And you don't have to center the 3D cursor first.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

When you press Shift+C, it moves your 3D cursor to 0, 0, 0, not you view. As to the pressing seven, you'll notice that at the top left of the viewport, it says Top Persp. You want an orthographic view. So, to change from a perspective view to an orthographic view, press 5 on you number pad. Now you should be looking straight down on the cube.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .