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For example I create 1 cube and extrude as much and as many things as I want out of it, but then I need to add a new cube to add a simple thing which couldn't be easily extruded from current mesh, so I do it...

Does that new cube get exported as separate mesh or are they joined into one mesh when exporting? And if it's not the latter, what would be the simplest way (if possible) to join them and delete faces which would be obstructed?

I've never used blender before (nor any other modelling software) so I have no idea how most stuff works in here.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Blender Stack exchange. You would be well advised to take the tour and review the help center, especially the parts about asking and answering questions. $\endgroup$ – brasshat Jul 11 '16 at 12:04
  • $\begingroup$ somehow related: blender.stackexchange.com/a/56155/1853 $\endgroup$ – cegaton Jul 11 '16 at 12:23
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The answer depends upon how the item is designed. One object can be one mesh, but one object can also contain two or more meshes. In Blender, the answer depends upon exactly how the new cube is added. If it is added in object mode, the new cube is a separate object. If the new cube, though, is added in edit mode, it may be part of the original object, even though it is a separate mesh.

The answer also might depend upon what you are importing the object into after export. Without knowing what you are going to be importing the exported object into, one cannot say for certain. It might be that the two meshes will be imported as separate objects, or as a single one.

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  • $\begingroup$ I want to create a simple "level" and export it into Unity so I can play around with first person controller, and I am not quite sure but I think one mesh would be better than many(for everything as in walls floor, windows, boxes, anything that will never be moved is one single mesh). And I meant adding new object as a part of original object, so will that be same mesh or a different one? $\endgroup$ – Purple Ice Jul 11 '16 at 12:19
  • $\begingroup$ Understanding a bit more what you want to do, I would suggest a slightly different learning path. First, spend time learning Blender, and when you have some attained modest facility with that platform, then start investigating export of items to Unity. One principle at applies to all of the 3D modeling platforms of which I have knowledge is that if one item is to move relative to another, it needs to be a separate object. So, if the door into the room is to be able to open, and the shutters over the window likewise, the door, the shutters, and the walls of the room need to be separate objects $\endgroup$ – brasshat Jul 11 '16 at 14:11
  • $\begingroup$ I kinda learned the first time I created basic object that separate object will be separate mesh if I export it separately (not as whole scene). But I wanted to ask how objects itself work (I already learned how to combine objects into one in blender), I just don't want to create one object which is a bit more complex only to find out that it causes massive lag for some reason. Even though I started learning only today, I already created few low poly normal trees and pine ones, so I don't really think different learning path is an option, I am more of programmer, not modeller. $\endgroup$ – Purple Ice Jul 11 '16 at 18:26

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