1
$\begingroup$

I've re-created a part for my bike, and I'm touching it up with Blender. It looks like this:

Picture of brake lever part.

Now the real life object has a groove running around it, which I'd like to re-create. It looks like this: enter image description here

As you can imagine, there are many faces on the object. I started going about it by just moving groups of faces, but this approach seems to be futile. What way would you recommend accomplishing this? Should I do a boolean with a bent and elongated torus shape? Bend a plane and extrude it and cut out the middle, and boolean with that?

Thanks for the help.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to the site, Tsaari. You might find it helpful to take the tour and review the sections of the help center covering asking and answering questions. $\endgroup$ – brasshat Jul 7 '16 at 7:43
1
$\begingroup$

The first thing I would recommend is retopoligizing and cleaning up your mesh. CG Cookie literally released a whole flow on retopoligizing not long ago so I would recommend trying that out (it does cost however). The other thing you could use if you don't mind spending about $70 is retopoflow. Very good resource from the blender market.

It is important to keep topology into consideration because it firstly makes overall editing very easy, and it allows you to properly use the sub-surf modifier for a smooth finish.

Once you have retopologized this, you will have a very nice simple mesh. Creating a grove around it should not be difficult. Just add in some edge loops and extrude inwards.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Tsaari, it appears to be a good job so far on your bike part.

Keep in mind that without seeing a copy of the ~.blend file for your bike part, it's impossible to know exactly how you made the original mesh. I'll get the rude, rough part of the answer out of the way early: if you do not have a clean mesh, it might be necessary to start over. An image in wireframe shading, or posting a copy of your blend file to Blend exchange would be helpful in evaluating your object, and determining the best way to proceed.

I am not fundamentally opposed to retopologizing as recommended by Matthew Inglis, in his answer, but my own personal preference tends to reserve that to organic models like character heads, and tend not to use it on engineered objects, like bike parts. That said, until more information is available, it's not clear that retopology is needed.

Assuming that the underling mesh is reasonably "clean", copy your whole part, and save the original in another layer as a back-up. Next, in the copy, select the all vertices that lie in the groove area, and two rows of vertices on each side. Define a vertex group containing these vertices. Invert the selection, and hide (H key), everything but the vertex group. Now select the vertex group, and make a copy of the vertices. Use the original as a master. Using the copy, create the groove the way you want it, making sure that the outer vertices of the reconfigured groove are not moved. When the groove is done, you can unhide the rest of the part, delete the extraneous vertices, and merge the groove into your mesh, remembering to remove doubles.

Assuming the x axis is aligned with the long dimension of the cross section of the part, You part appears to be symmetrical around the x-z plane. If you wind up having to remake the part, I'd model one half, of the part, and use a mirror modifier to show the other half.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Maybe you can try using curves and align vertex to them. It's a good way to get a perfect and straight edge.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.