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I have this sceneenter image description here

I have sun lamps but I don't know how to achieve advanced lighting in my scene, my lamps just contain yellow light.

And this is what it looks like when scene has hdr and also volumetric light. Is there any further tehnics to make it better. enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Try using HDRI image as environment texture for world material. $\endgroup$ – Leon Cheung Jul 6 '16 at 9:27
  • $\begingroup$ As it stands this question is too vague "advanced lighting" or "make it better" could mean too many things, all of them depending on what your intentions are. But I will say that having more than one sun will not be realistic (at least not in our solar system...) $\endgroup$ – user1853 Jul 6 '16 at 13:51
  • $\begingroup$ you should try the various options from the render color management available in the scene panel, this is applied after rendering so you can play around as you want with the settings and you can get awesome results. Try the "raw" option and tweak exposure and gamma for instance. Or Maybe you need to increase your lights power and/or turn up the anisotropy factor for your volume scatter (cycles?) $\endgroup$ – Yvain Jul 6 '16 at 16:35
  • $\begingroup$ yes its cycles and i should probably try that raw option.for the stones is it possible to make their volumetric lighting more solid?. $\endgroup$ – Roveldo Jul 6 '16 at 16:41
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In addition to using an HDRI, try adding a mist and/or Z pass, and then compositing in some color to the value in the compositor. Remember that you can use the color ramp with multiple points assigning multiple colors, so you can get some pretty neat effects. These colors can add or lessen brightness.

I am not sure this is a complete answer, but I could not post this screen shot as a comment. The sand below is not mine, but the acrocanthosaur is!

enter image description here

Regarding the lighting of the rocks -- mentioned in a later comment: You can use an object index pass to accomplish a lot of things, including light changes, focal issues and the like. Here is a good example and a node tree view:

Separate reflection based on object index cycles

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