0
$\begingroup$

im trying to get the hang of blender cloth simulation for an upcoming project of mine but for some reason when i add collision to the human its attached to so as to allow it respond with physics..it went crazy then i increased the gap between them and its still giving annoying reusltslike in the screenshots

margin given

EDIT The blend file with the updated cloth sim file but now its self collision that goes crazy The new blend file with changed values

maybe increasing the gap will give a better result but it will look too horrible if there is a work around for this i would really appreciate it and sorry i cant post more images due to my rep

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ upload .blend file? $\endgroup$ – eromod Jun 27 '16 at 12:27
  • $\begingroup$ I'm no expert at this, but I have seen lots of "crazy" behavior from the cloth simulator. A few things I've noticed: a) Make sure it starts off with the cloth outside of the collision surface. You can use springs & shrinkage to tighten it up, and then save the final "initial simulation" as the starting point for the real simulation. b) Pinning seems to help a lot. On my current design (a simple dress), just letting it fall on the shoulders causes it to eventually seep/rip through. Pinning it at the waist makes a big difference. c) Extreme values can cause odd behavior. $\endgroup$ – Jabberwock Jun 27 '16 at 16:17
  • $\begingroup$ its getting better i increased the distance but its still crazy ill upload the blend file...and @Jabberwock what do you mean by saving the final initial simulation as the starting point,can you please elaborate on that but thanks for the pointers too :) $\endgroup$ – kofoworola Jun 27 '16 at 22:17
  • $\begingroup$ so far ive managed to get a better result by reducing the collision margin and increasing collision quality of the cloth but if i use self collision it goes crazy $\endgroup$ – kofoworola Jun 27 '16 at 22:22
  • $\begingroup$ You can "apply" the cloth modifier at any point in the timeline of the simulation, either directly to the cloth mesh or as a shape key. I haven't done more than play around with it, so I don't know how well it works in practice. $\endgroup$ – Jabberwock Jun 28 '16 at 1:04
0
$\begingroup$

You might have better success if you scaled your model 100x, so that 1 unit = 1 cm.

In my experience, 1 unit/meter just isn't precise enough for proper collision detection, resulting in the cloth "puffing out". With 1 unit/centimeter, the simulation behaves much better.

I'd love to be proven wrong, though. It's not fun working with two separate scales.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I was wondering about that. The model I'm currently working on is (accidentally) ~5x (5 units/meter). I tried scaling it to 1:1 (to match the native scale of the linked rig), and the results were much, much worse. It seems like scaling the appropriate cloth parameters should correct it, but it doesn't seem to. $\endgroup$ – Jabberwock Jun 28 '16 at 12:59
  • $\begingroup$ thanks i tried scaling my model the way you said and it actually simulated better than usual thanks a lot....really what i needed $\endgroup$ – kofoworola Jun 28 '16 at 23:49
0
$\begingroup$

Add more loop cuts to the skirt (i.e., with CTRL-R), to make the mesh faces more square. I added about 5 cuts between each of yours, and it simulates much better now. It will start to look jumbled at first, but it should straighten out by around frame 40. This will of course make the mesh much bigger. You can also do coarser (but still squarish) faces and use a subdivision surface modifier.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.