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I am trying out the Cloud Generator AddOn that comes with Blender 2.67. I have created a a single cloud and selected the CloudPointDensity texture. Under Turbulence I have changed Influence from Static to Global Time.

This causes the cloud to evolve and change shape as time passes. However, I would like to change the speed of this evolution and I can not find anyway to accomplish this. I have tried Time Remapping and increasing the FPS of the scene. None of these attempts produces any other result other than the default evolution speed.

Is this possible with Blender? Or does this border on feature request?

Thanks

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm going to look at this later today. Modifying Time would have been my first guess, but now i read that you tried that already.. Been thinking about this question for a few days already.. We didn't forget about you! ;) $\endgroup$ – Wray Bowling Jun 6 '13 at 9:01
  • $\begingroup$ Have you tried changing the frame rate? $\endgroup$ – Owen Patterson Jun 9 '13 at 22:55
  • $\begingroup$ Just wanted to chime in: I played around for a bit with turbulence today. Still no solution. $\endgroup$ – Mike Pan Jun 15 '13 at 3:27
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Global time is basically just the frame number. As far as I know, Blender can't render in between frames, so there isn't a way to slow down global time.

(I may be wrong about that though. Maybe turbulence is computed as a current_frame / total_frames? In that case, you could try increasing/decreasing the number of frames. I don't have time to do a test case, at the moment.)

Instead, you should use "particle age" for the influence. To modify slow down the turbulence, you'll need to select the particles option when you first generate the cloud. This will let you edit the particle system associated with the point cloud texture. Longer particle lifetime = slower; shorter particle lifetime = faster.

See the Blender Wiki for the Point Density Texture

Edit: Oh, you could also just render it at slow speed, then speed it up using a "speed control" effect in the video sequencer. 'Tis a hack, but may suit your situation.

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