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I followed the Youtube tutorial by Mikey Cal Meyers on how to blur out an object in a strip. (All of his others have been so excellent). I followed his instructions to the tee, built the mask, got it all keyframed perfectly against my raw, never-cut strip. Then when I reviewed the mask playback over the video, it jumped all over the place, and did not follow the mask keyframes playing alongside in the identical video in the mask window. I went back and redid the steps from the tutorial, and got the same undesirable result.

I am running Blender 2.77 on a 64-bit laptop running Windows 8.

Anyone have experience overcoming this hurdle?

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    $\begingroup$ And you somehow think that you'll do any better leaning how to use Premiere Pro? You'll have the same problem there - you won't know how to do certain things. It sounds like you are having a hard time learning what buttons do what in blender, and somehow think it would be easier in Premiere. I strongly discourage giving up on Blender. $\endgroup$ – X-27 wants to Reinstate Monica May 26 '16 at 19:15
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    $\begingroup$ Admittedly, I was coming form a very frustrated place of having worked on this problem for quite a few hours, and that's spilling over in my post. I've heard great things about the Blender user community. I was really pleased picking up and using Blender a few months ago on the first video I've edited in umpteen years. I'm no stranger to high-learning curve technology--I was a 3D animator and art director in the game industry for 18 years (and occasionally used Premiere to edit in-game videos).However, there is much I am just now learning about the intricacies of video encoding, etc. $\endgroup$ – user6623 May 26 '16 at 20:40
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It's likely that you're running into the problem between Interframe Compression vs. Intraframe Compression.

Blender (and other video editors) often have trouble scrubbing through video that has been compressed referentially. In this type of compression, one frame is encoded as the changes from the previous frame, so all the data isn't there for every frame. This means, it's really easy to get lost between keyframes. I've seen this problem when I'm tracking video it seems like the track is really bad, and jumping all over the place, but what's really going on is the frame you're seeing isn't the right frame for that time signature.

Try converting to an Intraframe format (each full frame is compressed individually) like a JPG image sequence in an AVI container. Blender can do that conversion pretty easily.

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  • $\begingroup$ I just redid the mask on both an AVI JPEG sequence, and an AVI raw sequence. I got the same results as before, when it was a MPEG. I don't know if it is worth mentioning that I used autokeyframes ON, and repositioned the mask on every individual frame, including the first. (I just need the mask on 6 frames out of a 29-frame strip.) $\endgroup$ – user6623 May 26 '16 at 22:21
  • $\begingroup$ Related regarding frame accurate Footage import: blender.stackexchange.com/a/49219/2843 $\endgroup$ – Samoth May 27 '16 at 12:05
  • $\begingroup$ Interesting... I have no idea what could be causing that problem. $\endgroup$ – Matt May 27 '16 at 13:32
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I found my solution! The adjustment strip needed to be changed to start on frame 1, rather than 0. It is now starting one frame later than my input video strip, and the mask matches up perfectly to the action.

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