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I have a model as shown below, which is the product of two extrudes, bottom step followed by upper step. These are disjoint which I can see if I select the front face of the upper stair and drag it up, there's even a hidden face between.

Is there a way to merge them by deleting said hidden faces (orange arrow in the bottom image) and perhaps triangulate like I outlined with two lines on the bottom image?

If I had extruded upwards from the bottom step my hidden face would be along the wall instead, so no improvement. (I think it's a non-manifold mesh but https://blender.stackexchange.com/a/7914 does not help here as it selects no vertices or anything).

Stair case geometry

I could fix this by deleting the two faces touching in the above image and manually recreating the 3 triangles seen below. I was just hoping there was an automatic way to collapse "touching" geometry.

Manually fixed

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  • $\begingroup$ slect the vertices you want to connect and press J $\endgroup$
    – user1853
    Commented May 21, 2016 at 21:41
  • $\begingroup$ Tried that but it seems to join the underside face seeing as the that's the only route between the vertices since they were extruded independently, if that makes sense. Tried it here Jkey $\endgroup$
    – Sheph
    Commented May 21, 2016 at 21:53
  • $\begingroup$ The face I want to get rid of and connect the above stair to the below one so operations such as subdivision works properly. $\endgroup$
    – Sheph
    Commented May 21, 2016 at 22:00
  • $\begingroup$ I updated main post with a manual fix (had to remove your edit sorry!). Was just hoping for a automatic way to merge two touching faces like that. $\endgroup$
    – Sheph
    Commented May 21, 2016 at 22:09

2 Answers 2

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Delete both overlapping faces. Then select the edges on both steps and do bridge edge loops.

enter image description here

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Select the vertices you want to join and press M. Then, press at center.

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    $\begingroup$ Could you add more info please? $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 1, 2020 at 18:15

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