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How to make water flow from the certain areas of an object?

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I am making an animated character, made of water. I was going to make the illusion of water, with shaders and different deformations, but I also wanted to make that the water drains from the character to the ground, so I started thinking about the possibility of making some areas of the character as the source of water.

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    $\begingroup$ Please specify in your question 1) Whether you're wanting a fluid sim solution, or any solution 2) What you've already tried 3) Which problems you're encountering. $\endgroup$ – Matt May 11 '16 at 18:39
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    $\begingroup$ Anything that qualifies as a "Tutorial request" can get flagged for deletion, so you want to make sure your question is NOT that. $\endgroup$ – Matt May 11 '16 at 18:40
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    $\begingroup$ Possible ways could be either to put and hide a fluid object where you'd like final fluid to come from or to make main object as a fluid obstacle and leave only certain part opened where fluid will come out. $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak May 11 '16 at 18:55
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    $\begingroup$ @MrZak Thank you! It is also a good option, but in my case it will be an animated character made of water, and I thought that to make some parts of his body as water sources will be easier. I added a watering can as the most simple illustration of the meaning of my question. $\endgroup$ – Rumata May 11 '16 at 19:05
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    $\begingroup$ Please edit your question to update it with these details. $\endgroup$ – Matt May 11 '16 at 19:32
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It's better to use a special object to be the emitter, by duplicating the part of the mesh you need the fluid to emitt from Shift + D your selection in edit mode, then P and choose "Selection" to separate the mesh to a new object, assign the particles to the new object, position your vertices were you want the water to emitt.
You can use "Vertices" option instead of "Faces" in the Particles Tab parameters, Under "Emission" panel > "Emit From:".
Remember to uncheck the "Emitter" check box if you don't want the emitting object to show in render.

Edit: Adding images for better explanation.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much, I will try this method and receive the answer as soon as I understand if this is what I was looking for. Thank you! $\endgroup$ – Rumata May 11 '16 at 19:07
  • $\begingroup$ You're most welcome, I added some images to explain the process better. $\endgroup$ – Georges May 11 '16 at 19:11
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, I accept this answer. I thought maybe there's an opportunity to draw the area using weight or vertex paint, but apparently this capability is not provided in Blender... $\endgroup$ – Rumata May 11 '16 at 19:43
  • $\begingroup$ I have two questions: 1) If the object is animated - I should simply parent the emiter to an object so it can move as a part of a whole? 2) In this case, you are considering a system of particles, similarly in case of water I should use a fluid simulation? I searched but didn't find tutorials on how to simulate liquid using particle system. In the tutorials that I have found, the particles seemed unrealistic - in the form of small spheres. $\endgroup$ – Rumata May 11 '16 at 19:43
  • $\begingroup$ In some cases, this method may not be the best option, for example if I need a part the sleeves on the shirt of the character to became a particle emitter - I can't separate the part of the sleeve without changing the simulation of the fabric (unless I bake the entire simulation, this is a too complicated process). It would be great if in the future the opportunity to paint an area of emiter would appeare in Blender. $\endgroup$ – Rumata May 11 '16 at 19:46

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