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I'm trying to make a blender animation for Christmas, so I am kind of pressed for time. It is snowing in the scene, so I have watched tutorials on the particles. I tried it, but it looked too much like rain when I plated the animation. Snow is supposed to lightly drift to the ground, and when I use the particles it looks more like rain and it fell way too fast.

How can I get a snowy effect without the rain effect?

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1 Answer 1

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There are several things you could try, here are a few:

  • Try increasing the Drag force in Particle Settings > Physics > Forces to make particles affected by air resistance:

    enter image description here

  • Decrease the influence of the scene Gravity in Particle settings > Field Weights to make particles fall more slowly:

    enter image description here

  • Add a Turbulence force field (ShiftA> Force Field > Turbulence) to make particles drift in random directions, simulating eddies and air currents:

    enter image description here

Result:

Animated gif

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    $\begingroup$ You can also use Brownian Motion in place of the turbulence object. It simplifies things a bit and makes large scale scenes easier to work with. $\endgroup$
    – CharlesL
    Nov 25, 2013 at 19:37
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    $\begingroup$ @CharlesL You could, but I liked the effect of the force field better. To me the brownian motion seemed to make the particles go up more than they should. It's a matter of personal preference I guess. $\endgroup$
    – gandalf3
    Nov 25, 2013 at 20:49
  • $\begingroup$ How do you use the wind turbulence? $\endgroup$ Dec 12, 2013 at 17:07
  • $\begingroup$ @JoshuaSlink What do you mean? Just add a force field empty to the scene by pressing Shift+A Force Field > Turbulence. It will automatically affect the particles. You can change the strength and other settings in the Physics panel. See the wiki for for info. $\endgroup$
    – gandalf3
    Dec 13, 2013 at 1:28

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