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I am about to begin animating my project. I plan to add music later, and at that point I will be fine-tuning the animation, syncing it to the music. At what fps should I animate? I am new to this and bound to make some terrible mistake, so I am wondering is there any crucial detail I should know now before I animate, so I do not run into any audio/video sync problems later? I read on one of the posts here that 29.97 fps is the best frame rate to use for animation, to avoid future sync problems, but perhaps I do not understand?

Any advice is appreciated!

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If I were you I would take your song's tempo into consideration when choosing a frame rate. This is assuming you don't have tempo changes - if you do there's nothing you can really do since the frame rate must remain constant.

Here's a handy BPM / FPS calculator to help you choose the best frame rate for your song.

So for example, if your song is 120BPM and your video is 30FPS you are looking at 15 frames per beat.

Keep in mind that the song tempo should not be the only criteria to consider. You should consider how this video will be delivered as well, like is it only for YouTube, or does it need to play on some specific devices, etc. Higher frame rates are usually better, but will obviously increase file size and render time. If your tempo can fit into 30 or 24 FPS, one of these will be pretty easy to work in while being hi fidelity enough for most situations.

Finally, if you have software that will allow you to change the tempo of your song, don't rule out that option.

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I don't think you can run into synchronisation issues since you're going to synchronise the audio with the video when you add the audio. I would just use the fps that's standard for where you want to put your video. Also note that rendering with more fps than what you will export in the end may result in a worse motion blur (if applicable) and it will take you much longer to render. For perfect audio video synchronisation you just need to make sure that your animation matches your music in tempo. FPS does not change the speed of your animation.

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Unless you expect to have a variable FPS rate, the "S"—that is, the time—is really the critical part of the FPS. But the answer depends at least in part upon your workflow is. Are you preparing the animation first, and then selecting the music to fit, or are have you already chosen the music you want to use for the animation. If you've already chosen the music, and you want to synchronize the animation to the music, then determine what part of the animation will coincide with what musical events, and then measure the time from the beginning of the song to the each of the musical events and then construct your animation so that the matching animation event occurs at the correct amount of time from the beginning of the presentation. Or more specifically, if there is a musical event at 37.5 seconds into the song that you want to synchronize with a spin of the character, you multiply the time, 37.5, by the FPS you're using, say 30 FPS, and the spin will need to be around frame 1125.

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