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Some art styles increase the saturation in their shading, I'm trying to achieve this effect as seen in cell #2 of my example image. Right now it looks like cell #3, which lacks this and looks dull in the render.

Shaders

I just have #1 as a default frame of reference, and #4 is an exaggeration of the effect I want; using color for darker areas instead of just darkening. If I could achieve the effect in cell #4, I could easily change it to be like cell #2.

So far I have tried creating 2 material nodes with one of them inverted, and then mixing them. This doesn't show in render mode, and it still doesn't let me change the color where needed. I'm not sure how to go about creating the effect shown in cell #2, because I'm quite new to nodes.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'd like to make a note that adding an emission node can achieve this look, but it makes the object glow when the lights are off, and said glow shines on other surfaces. $\endgroup$ Mar 25, 2016 at 1:24
  • $\begingroup$ possibly helpful How to render cartoon style with completely flat colors? $\endgroup$
    – David
    Mar 25, 2016 at 1:30
  • $\begingroup$ Possibly add the shader to itself, maybe multiple times? $\endgroup$
    – PGmath
    Mar 25, 2016 at 1:58
  • $\begingroup$ Light Bwk's answer there worked, many thanks. $\endgroup$ Mar 25, 2016 at 2:06

5 Answers 5

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Spheres 1 and 3 look like BSDF Shaders, but spheres 2 and 4 look like Emission Shaders, as they do not seem to get darker in the shadow.

When you add a node in the shader editor, add a Normal Node (not normal map but normal node).

Add an Emission Shader, and use the "Dot" product from the Normal Node to mix the color input (see the node setup below):

enter image description here

(Note: We multiply by .5 and add .5 to map the dot product to 0->1).

If you now drag and rotate the sphere on the Normal Node, you can create a "fake light and shadow" effect like the spheres on 2 and 4.

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This is something you can do very easily in the Blender Internal renderer, where, unlike Cycles, you can feed the output of light's interaction with a surface back into the calculation.

In Cycles, this would lead to a feedback loop: (lighting affects surface affects lighting affects....), so there, you would have break the loop by baking the outcome of one light/surface interaction as, say, a diffuse texture, and use it to influence a second.

Simplest sort of node setup:

enter image description here

(You can use the shading output any way you like)

Result..

enter image description here

In Cycles, you could find a more physically-based route to a specific effect you were looking for .. perhaps subsurface scattering, translucency, fresnel...

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I think you could get something like that by using a fresnel node to increase the saturation along the edges along with an emission shader.

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In Blender Internal Render, just increase the Translucency of the material to $1$ for the #2.

For the #4, just "layer weight" two materials.

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Just a quick fix to DrachenSeele's solution for the pseudo-shading effect:

  1. Feed the "Normal" (output socket) from the "Geometry Node" node into the "Normal Node".

  2. Feed the "Dot" (output socket) of the "Normal Node" into the "Factor" (input socket) of the "Mix Shader" (for even better results, divide by 2.0 and add 0.5 using "Math Nodes" before feeding into the "Mix Shader").

Hope this helps! Cheers and God bless!

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