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Hello blender community,

I am trying to learn the compositor in blender but I came across a small problem. I placed the environment in the first layer and the sun in the second (sky in both disabled) like you can see in the image. I renderd both layers together by selecting the two layers.

The problem is that I cannot see the sun in the compositor or when I render both layers together

I did the same thing as the video showed so can somebody help me out?

I looked around in other similar question but that didn't help me

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ In the "sun" render layer preview it looks as there actually is something (probably the "sun-sphere" object unlit). What did you expect to see? Could you post a link to the video you mentioned? $\endgroup$
    – Carlo
    Dec 29, 2015 at 12:25
  • $\begingroup$ @Carlo youtube.com/watch?v=fWcCkQ3943Y . I except to see a yellow sphere appearing above the hills. here an image of how the render looks now: puu.sh/mcr0M/dbd4c94e17.jpg . Like you can see there is no sun but I selected both layers and in the none rendered view (right corner view on the image in the question) you can see the sun $\endgroup$
    – Vinc199789
    Dec 29, 2015 at 12:37
  • $\begingroup$ Don't use add on a color mix node, but an alpha over node. See this post: blender.stackexchange.com/a/38334/1853 or use the alpha information of the foreground layer as a factor on the mix node $\endgroup$
    – user1853
    Mar 28, 2016 at 15:10
  • $\begingroup$ The lamp (in this case sun) won't be seen in render even if it's there. Unticking Sky isn't the best way of overlaying 2 rendered images together, see blender.stackexchange.com/questions/1303/… $\endgroup$
    – Mr Zak
    Mar 28, 2016 at 18:51

1 Answer 1

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I found the problem.

1) I needed to uncheck "use alpha" in the compositor.
2) add an alpha over to combine two layers.

I only don't understand why?

enter image description here

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