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I'm modeling a guitar. I have the top wood texture applied. I would like to know how to get some variation in the extruded sides. Right now it looks more like a butcher block table top, there should be some sort of variation in grain pattern. Thanks. guitar top render
(source: ibanezcollectors.com)

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    $\begingroup$ Hi! The simple method you used is suited only for flat 2d faces, afaik: to texture all the sides, you have to learn UV mapping (blender.org/manual/editors/uv_image/uv_mapping.html), which shortly is a way create a 2d map for 3d objects. Then you can apply a texture to the whole 3d object through a single 2d map, and later learn how to use multiple maps, etc... $\endgroup$
    – m.ardito
    Commented Dec 4, 2015 at 8:46
  • $\begingroup$ Would you mind posting a packed .blend? I'm curious to see how well the techniques I shared in my answer will work on your model with your texture specifically. $\endgroup$
    – Mentalist
    Commented Dec 8, 2015 at 9:56

2 Answers 2

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it varies with render engine. Although with cycles this setup should give basic variance

enter image description here

There's many more solutions

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Will this guitar be an acoustic hollow-body or an electric? (Guessing electric, based on your image.) Because hollow-body guitars are assembled from separate strips of wood, while electric guitars are made from solid pieces of wood. And this makes a difference in the way the wood grain flows.

Either way, for this texture you will get the best results by UV mapping, which as others have pointed out, is another topic well-covered here in many questions. I'm sure you won't have any trouble finding info on it. I will add to that though that you will probably want to paint seamless edges using the Clone Brush. So look into the Clone brush as well.

If you want to avoid UV mapping you can create variation by mixing procedural textures in with the vector data that maps your image textures. In the following example, there are two materials on the object. The top of the object is UV mapped. The sides use another material that is mapped to a mix of object coordinate data and a noise texture's color output.

Note the two materials:

One material for UV, another for procedural

The node setup for the procedural vector-driven material:

enter image description here

A variation on this that creates a wavy effect using normal data:

Wavy variation using normal data

Again, if I were creating a guitar like yours I would go with UV mapping and texture painting with the Clone Brush. But I wanted to show that there are other possibilities too, and I hope I could give you some ideas.

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