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So, I've created a little light-saber, (I got the idea from here, but I got carried away and my model looks nothing like the video.)

Feel free to download the file here.

...The UV unwrapping, sadly, has been a disaster. The output makes so little sense it could've strained Euler's short term memory, because I have no idea what "piece" (what are those called again?) of the UV map goes where on the model.

My model looks like this:' enter image description here

I got some effect out of applying scale, as the unwrap is no longer some huge distortion extending several times the length of the grid, but still utterly useless. enter image description here

As you can see, most people won't be able to see how this was unwrapped. At the moment I only have three seams, onet is along the "bottom" of the shape directly under the one asymmetrical part (the protrusion visible to your right.) The other two are on either side of the protrusion, but instead of red lines I see thick black lines:

enter image description here

in one of the places I want the seam (I assume I want seams about asymmetries.) I don't know what these black lines mean and I can't tell if there is any seam there.

Thanks for the help!

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The issue here is the angle from which you performed the Cylindrical projection. UV projections behaves differently according to the angle from which you're looking at your model. In this case, you should project from the angle that represents the length of your cylindrical object, which in your case is the top view.

enter image description here

You can also simply use the UV unwrap (U > Unwrap) to get a nice map according to the seams you created: enter image description here

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The problem lies with the way you're trying to unwrap what is essentially a cylinder, which has a fairly standard workflow to get a proper UV for. By using a single seam along the length of the cylinder, you get this result:

Observe the long red seam along the length of the lightsaber

Of course, ideally you would get something a little less distorted, for which Blender has a nice solution: select a quad that is straight, or make one straight, and press "follow active quads" after a little more work you get this:

enter image description here

Which seems to be at least a good start. I would suggest looking into some good tutorials for UV mapping 3D meshes, which you can find on sites like Polycount and cgtutsplus

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  • $\begingroup$ Did you use cylinder unwrap? $\endgroup$ – user1833028 Nov 25 '15 at 17:34
  • $\begingroup$ Actually all I did for this one is press "e" in the UV space, which is the default shortkey for "unwrap", so that blender would just apply whatever standard unwrap it could come up with given the seams I had defined. After that I used "follow active quads" on the parts that are straight in the second image. $\endgroup$ – MaVCArt Nov 26 '15 at 8:35

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