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I can't figure out how to put a dome on a five sided polygon like so. Any ideas? Thanks!

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  • $\begingroup$ Are you trying to fit 6 sided dome onto 5 side base, or do you want to model exactly what is on the picture? $\endgroup$ – Jaroslav Jerryno Novotny Nov 23 '15 at 14:43
  • $\begingroup$ @Jerryno Exactly what is on the picture, but I'll take anything really. :) Been struggling with this one for a while. $\endgroup$ – Allen Gingrich Nov 23 '15 at 14:47
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Loopcuts+Cast modifier

Start from adding a regular pentagon to the scene (a circle with 5 vertices).

Inset the ngon (i) and add some loopcuts.

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Then add a Cast modifer controlled by an empty which you should put a little below the pentagon (depending on the shape you wauld like to get) to make it bump up. You could also use Proportional editing with "Sphere" influence if you already have an idea of the final silouhette of the tend.

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Enable modifier visibility while editing to add further loopcuts in the parts that need a higher polygon resolution.

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Set the object shading to smooth, mark sharp edges and add an Edge Split modifier.

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You can get a similar result also with Subdivision Subsurface modifier (not suggested, too many faces and it's difficoult to achieve the correct curvature)

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Cloth simulation

If you are looking for a realistic definition of the surface (in the middle of each sector the fabric should be a litte more loose), you can let the physic model it for you by running a cloth simulation.

Pin the vertices along the boundary, define the arcs and create seam between the arch and the tissue below. Now fill the field in the cloth sewing panel and start tweaking the settings to find the wanted curvature of the fabric.

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  • $\begingroup$ That is so pro. Jesus, I would have never thought of this. Thanks so, so much! I'm going to delay accepting for just a bit, in case someone else is working on an answer that they want to finish, but this seems like the winner! By the way, any opinion on creating the poles, too? Thanks again! So helpful. $\endgroup$ – Allen Gingrich Nov 23 '15 at 15:16
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    $\begingroup$ I agree with you, you should leave it open also because I am now noticing that what I have build is not the exact model in the picture as you stated in the comments (the arcs should not intersect themselfs in the middle, but a bit aside). $\endgroup$ – Carlo Nov 23 '15 at 15:47
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, Carlo. Your addition makes this answer even better, with the cloth simulation. If I could steal one last parcel of your time, how would you manage the actual poles themselves? I'm thinking duplicate the edges and scale them out, then work off of those, but perhaps there is a much better way? $\endgroup$ – Allen Gingrich Nov 23 '15 at 16:31
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    $\begingroup$ I would select the sharp edges, duplicate them, separate in a new object, convert it to a Curve, add to it a bezier circle as a bevel object and shift the bezier circle's origin a little: imgur.com/MZAg7HP. $\endgroup$ – Carlo Nov 23 '15 at 16:59

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