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Expanding upon this.

I want to make a desert sun. I am likely to use the answer provided in the linked question, but then I think "hey, let's go and stick a light source in it!"

Which light source do I use? Some testing that I've done has ruled out using a Sun for a sun. (Such irony that the Sun source isn't the best for a sun.)

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm not exactly sure what you are asking, what wouldn't work about a sun lamp? $\endgroup$ – PGmath Nov 8 '15 at 14:42
  • $\begingroup$ Are you working in cycles our internal? $\endgroup$ – cegaton Nov 8 '15 at 14:54
  • $\begingroup$ Internal. The Sun light source actually hangs above the centerpoint of the sphere, thus leaving a light difference. $\endgroup$ – Nefer007 Nov 8 '15 at 14:55
  • $\begingroup$ use a point light $\endgroup$ – cegaton Nov 9 '15 at 7:30
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    $\begingroup$ I think there is no good answer for any "I want to make a sun" question, as it seems more an artistic interpretation and not a lighting issue, imho. If you have any reference in mind, post a link or embed it in the question, that would help others to suggest best way to achieve the desired effect $\endgroup$ – m.ardito Nov 9 '15 at 14:26
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The best way would be using either a Point or an Area light.

A Point light is how an astronomer would see the sun: a big hot ball of ultraviolet radiation and scorching fire. Point lights emit light in all directions.

A Sun light is how someone on the ground would experience the Sun: something really high up that shines down on the ground. The sphere object would have gotten in the way.

A Spot light is a flat Sun light. It projects a two-dimensional circle onto a three-dimensional world, sometimes bending to scale with the objects.

A Hemi light has the nasty habit of affecting all planes equally, even if a Sun or Spot light cannot reach because they are being blocked by another object/plane.

An Area light is a Point light with gamma controls and the ability to choose the bounds and direction of the light.

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