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I am doing some tutorials with balloons and found this post about a balloon shader. I want to apply the shader to my balloon (in the image only one balloon visible). In this shader image textures are used. And the writer says "For unwrapping I selected the sphere-like part and used the unwrapping function “UV-Sphere” with “View on Equator”. It worked best in terms of texture stretching." I am a real newbie in UV mapping and I don't understand this.

enter image description here

After the UV unwrapping (UV Sphere) I have this result. Should I do something more or is this OK ?

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ View on Equator is option of the Sphere projection unwrapping method, and it's used by default (you can see it in the Last operator panel, or F6 after unwrapping) . I.e. Blender will automatically consider this direction of the unwrapping sphere. $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak Oct 1 '15 at 17:18
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Sphere projection will cause serious texture stretching. If you plan to apply a seamless texture to a sphere, you have to choose between stretching and seams.

This is what stretching will look like: stretched sphere

This is what seams will look like: seamed sphere

To avoid both seams and stretches you must use texture painting or a shader without image textures.

I suggest you start with doing a real UV-unwrap and see how it turns out. It is like imagine your model is built with paper, then cutting it open to be able to flatten it out without making any wrinkles.

Select edges like this and hit Ctrl+E to bring up the menu. Select "mark seam".

unwrap

When all the cuts are made, hit u to unwrap. Select "Unwrap" at the top. Open a new editor (I always use the timeline) and make it display "UV/Image editor". See your unwrapping. If you don't see it, select all geometry in the 3D editor.

unwrapped baloon

About texture painting, it is a whole new chapter. Google up some tutorial, do your homework and come back if you get stuck.

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