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In responding to a recent question someone told me that my mesh had a lot of "duplicate geometry". At the time I did not really understand the remark but I think I now begin to understand. I also became aware that for instance the extrude tool creates duplicate geometry.

Question When looking at my mesh how can I see that there is a lot of duplicate geometry and how to clean that up ?

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  • $\begingroup$ Press A, W > Remove Doubles. $\endgroup$ – p2or Sep 30 '15 at 10:31
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Usually doubles and duplicate geometry are unintentional, but sometimes you might have geometry that is intentionally in close proximity to other geometry so that you can't just do a remove doubles on the entire object.

There's a couple of Low-Tech ways that i'd like to suggest first.

  • If you press Z, in edit mode, you'll see a transparent / half opaque mesh. Faces that are duplicated in place will often appear darker. enter image description here.
    Keep in mind that Backfacing Faces will also appear darker, so don't get confused :)
  • In Object mode, you'll see duplicate edges because they are drawn using the same color as the border of a mesh. Whether or not this is intentional I don't know, but it works well to track down duplicates edges. enter image description here

  • In Face selection mode of Edit Mode, look for Dots on edges. Dots indicate the median of a face and should never been visible on edges.
    enter image description here
    You see this with geometry that you've accidentally extruded without translating the new face.

  • In vertex selection mode of Edit Mode, look for vertices which don't highlight surrounding edges:

    enter image description here

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removing duplicate geometry

Select everything in edit mode by pressing A. Press ctrlV, click remove doubles, and you're done. It's as easy as that.

enter image description here

After clicking Remove Doubles, you can set the merge distance by bringing up the Tool Shelf (T) and going to the bottom.

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