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I initially learned how to model using Maya, and so I relate everything back to that way of working in 3d space. I want to start modeling in Blender but I am having trouble with some basics...

So in Maya, if I wanted to create a box and snap one its corners to the grid, I would create a box, hit the insert key, snap the pivot point to the corner vertex I want, and then use new pivot point to transform the box to the origin of my grid space.

...but in Blender I can snap the 3d cursor to a corner, and then when I try to move by increments to the origin it won't snap to the origin but instead, it will snap 1 grid unit from the current location.

What is the standard way to do something simple like this? When I search the manual, it seems like it doesn't understand my terminology. Pivot points work in rotation but not in transforming my object, so if I successfully set the 3d cursor to the corner I want and then type in 0,0,0 into the location coordinates, it centers the object on the origin instead of snapping the corner to the origin.

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  • $\begingroup$ Increment snap always snaps by increments relative to the object's location, never directly to the grid. If you snap the object to the grid first (Shift S), then the increments will line up with the grid. $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Aug 31 '15 at 0:23
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, I tested this out. This gets my box where I want it after some maneuvering, but the transform is still from the center of the object. Is this always going to be the case? $\endgroup$ – tantangula Aug 31 '15 at 1:58
  • $\begingroup$ I have also been trying use the 3d cursor as the pivot and snapping it to a vert in edit mode. This lets me rotate from that point, but when I move the object, the 3d cursor stays in the same spot. $\endgroup$ – tantangula Aug 31 '15 at 2:00
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, the 3D cursor is always independent. If you have the pivot point set to the 3D cursor, transforms will "originate" from wherever the 3D cursor is relative to the transformed element's initial position. Of course, for translation the pivot point doesn't really matter (unless you are using transform snapping). $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Aug 31 '15 at 3:21
  • $\begingroup$ Tranform of an object depends upon several factors, one of which is what mode you are in. In object mode, transform operations are based upon the origin of the object (the orange dot associated wiith the object. The origin may, or may not, be located at the center of the object. In Edit mode, transform operations involve the selected Blender elements, and may be independent of the object origin. $\endgroup$ – brasshat Aug 31 '15 at 5:49
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  • First go to the Edit mode of your Cube and select the vertex you want to snap the pivot to.

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  • Then press ShiftS to open the Snap menu and select Cursor to Selected. Now you will see the 3D Cursor appear at the vertex.

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  • After that you have to quit the Edit Mode and go to the Object mode of the Cube, then press ShiftCtrlAltC to open Set Origin menu and choose Origin to 3D Cursor.

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  • When thats been done, (still in object mode) press ShiftC to make the 3D Cursor go back on the grid and while your Cube is selected press ShiftS and choose the second option Selection to Cursor.

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Now this will snap your Cube on to the grid.

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Blender has many modes for meshes. Edit mode will move vertices. Object mode will move the entire object.

Hit keyboard tab and select Edit. You are now in edit mode for mesh.

Edit vertices. Select vertices by clicking and shift clicking and move them with mouse by pressing the letter g, hit Enter to finish. Vertex snapping can occur here.

When you are finished tap keyboard tab and select Object mode.

All of what I wrote above is best explained in a video tutorial.

Blender may have some compatibility keystrokes with Maya.

Here is tutorial series about Blender.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lY6KPrc4uMw&list=PLda3VoSoc_TR7X7wfblBGiRz-bvhKpGkS

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  • $\begingroup$ Hey thanks for the reply. I want to move all the verts at once, and keep the shape of my object exactly the same. I'm just trying to figure out what Blender uses to accomplish this task. $\endgroup$ – tantangula Aug 31 '15 at 1:48

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