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I have been using Blender for quite a long time and I just want to make sure that there isn't a better way of selecting edges, that I might not be aware of. It is so cumbersome to have to click every single edge when I don't want to select an entire edge loop but a portion of one instead. I was wondering if there is some way in to specify a start edge and an end edge and then be able to auto select every edge in between?

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  • $\begingroup$ Does the Shortest Path option from Select menu solve this ? (I think there's no shortcut, but you can make yours) $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak Aug 19 '15 at 22:26
  • $\begingroup$ Well I am glad I asked because that works! Post it as an answer and I will select it as answering my question. $\endgroup$ – Bryson Jack Aug 19 '15 at 22:29
  • $\begingroup$ You probably already know this, but you can use "Circle Select" (c) or "Border Select" (b) to select points/edges/faces without having to click each time (just hold the mouse button down). They automatically add to the current selection, and holding option cause them to subtract from the current selection. $\endgroup$ – Cody Reisdorf Mar 5 '17 at 21:47
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While this is not what this feature is intended for, on straight or simple meshes you can use Shortest Path from the Select menu with the two points selected or by selecting the starting point then selecting the end point while holding Ctrl. You can also incrementally add to your selection by holding Ctrl.

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  • $\begingroup$ Curious. What was the feature intended for if not to be used as a selection tool to solve this particular problem? BTW..you should add that you can keep holding down Ctrl to add to the selection in increments when Shortest Path fails to give you the selection you want. $\endgroup$ – Bryson Jack Aug 19 '15 at 22:35
  • $\begingroup$ @BrysonJack It tries to find the shortest path between two selected points. Add a cube, subdivide it 2 times and then run it while trying new points that are close to each other, it will more than likely differ each time. It's useful in retopology or when building nav meshes. $\endgroup$ – iKlsR Aug 19 '15 at 22:38

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